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  • Vango
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    EdFury -- I agree. I think 5, 10 million, that's the sweet spot. Hell or High Water was a good movie. It is important to think about budget when writing a screenplay, because it's part of a business plan. Artists can design the craziest concept cars, but those are not the cars that are getting made. As a side note, Hunger Games would not have gotten made with just the script and no book.

    Gucci -- I have seen Upgrade and I loved it. As for why you haven't gotten something made, I don't know you, but from what I do see, you're very driven, and very talented. The one time I went to LA and spent several days there, I met quite a few people who were writers, directors, actors, etc, and for some reason, everyone wanted to send me their script. Tbh, I did not read even one good script. These were from people who had gotten paid at some point for either their writing/directing/acting. Some people believe they are better than they really are, and that does not seem like you. You seem like a humble guy who's working hard to get to the top -- and I believe you will get there.

    Bono -- that is a fantastic idea. I have been writing a short for 6 months now. It's 10 pages, and I've rewritten it 15 times, all the same concept, all different structures. There are a few people attached who are impatiently waiting for me to finish. I am also working on a novel. So I agree, anything to get our work out there. But, and this is just my opinion, it is important not to compromise quality. Sometimes people seem really eager to make something. They throw a short together and say "I can't wait to show this to my reps." I'd rather have 3 credits on my IMDB profile when I retire, and all of them award-worthy, highly rated and known, than have 35 credits, most of which are things none of us have ever heard of.

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    add short film, novel, article and go viral to that list...
    Yup... true!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    add short film, novel, article and go viral to that list...

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Man, it's a mindfukk!

    My creatives' friends are all doing different sh!t. Different approaches.

    -Writing spec features just to sell

    -Writing to direct

    -Writing small sh!t with foreign financing (his last film financed shady as fukk, got made tho)

    -Writing for TV

    -Directing music vids wanting to direct features

    They all have different advice... "No, dude, you gotta ______!"

    All of them are like "Dude, you're a way better writer than me... how the fukk haven't you gotten something MADE yet?" ME: Dunno... Idiot????

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Producer friend: Don't worry about budget. Make a great script. That's all that matters from a writing standpoint. If you're thinking of what YOU can make then sure, keep budget in mind.

    Pro writer friend with big comedy movie last year: When you go into pre-pro, they'll make you rewrite what they can't afford. Just write a great script -- that's all that matters.

    I never rely on just my dumb thoughts. I ask others. I'm skeptical of even myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    And I just like to point out every piece of advice given by an industry person someone else disagrees or have a different POV. And they aren't buying this today, but tomorrow they are.

    If we all listened to every piece of advice, we would never be able to write anything because according to the advice there's no point...
    True... so GO WITH GOD! Ha!

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by EdFury View Post
    I wish this advice was true because it would be great to write 40 million dollar films. The problem? No one is making them in any significant numbers and even then they're mostly recognizable IPs. If one or two slip in a year, they're from established writers or writer / directors. Producers ARE looking for the next Hell or High Water which was written, according to Taylor Sheridan, as a 5 million dollar film. It ballooned to 12m with the attached talent.

    There are tons of producers with access to 1 to 5 million budgets. There are a lot fewer producers as you get past those figures. And screw managers who say they can't make money on sending out scripts in that range. I fired one about 10 seconds after he said that to me, sent the script to my agent who loved it and is shopping it. Look at who has writing assignments on studio films and where they came from originally. Successful low budget films.

    Of course you think about budget if you're trying to break in. It's about getting credits. It's about getting produced. I'll take the hundreds of producers who can make a low budget film over the maybe 25 that can make a 40 million dollar film every day. Those hundreds of producers won't even read a script with a 10+ million dollar budget because they dont have that kind of money. How do I know this? Talking to these producers who ask me what new I have in the 5 million range. Two calls yesterday. I send a pitch to one, 2 scripts to another.

    The days of the mid-range film for new writers is gone. They're either based on IPs, true stories or from established writers or selected Nicholl winners. I wish this wasn't true, but from everything I see and hear, it is. You need to write accordingly.

    This is also my current MODEL. I'm kinda sick of generals and not getting produced. I've had a general lead somewhere exactly ONCE!

    On my new one (the one that's going out now), the film version could have been done for 5 mil or less. I think I could do it for 2 mil. My manger was cool with me attaching as director in that price range. But, then it was turned into a TV show and I'm obviously out as director. But, that's more where I'm focused right now. I've tried to go big studio route and all I get is generals, so I figure it's time to try something different.

    But, I think you still need to hang on to your "This MUST be high concept and/or look like an Oscar contender" mentality even at that much lower budget.

    Have you seen UPGRADE? It looks beautiful. It looks like a 30 mil movie (they even had a fukkin car chase!). Smart choices got that movie MADE. Smart directing kept it on budget. That's when I knew for sure I needed to drop my budgets. Sci-fi/Action for 5mil... Gross 16 mil = successful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    And I just like to point out every piece of advice given by an industry person someone else disagrees or have a different POV. And they aren't buying this today, but tomorrow they are.

    If we all listened to every piece of advice, we would never be able to write anything because according to the advice there's no point...

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by EdFury View Post
    I wish this advice was true because it would be great to write 40 million dollar films. The problem? No one is making them in any significant numbers and even then they're mostly recognizable IPs. If one or two slip in a year, they're from established writers or writer / directors. Producers ARE looking for the next Hell or High Water which was written, according to Taylor Sheridan, as a 5 million dollar film. It ballooned to 12m with the attached talent.

    There are tons of producers with access to 1 to 5 million budgets. There are a lot fewer producers as you get past those figures. And screw managers who say they can't make money on sending out scripts in that range. I fired one about 10 seconds after he said that to me, sent the script to my agent who loved it and is shopping it. Look at who has writing assignments on studio films and where they came from originally. Successful low budget films.

    Of course you think about budget if you're trying to break in. It's about getting credits. It's about getting produced. I'll take the hundreds of producers who can make a low budget film over the maybe 25 that can make a 40 million dollar film every day. Those hundreds of producers won't even read a script with a 10+ million dollar budget because they dont have that kind of money. How do I know this? Talking to these producers who ask me what new I have in the 5 million range. Two calls yesterday. I send a pitch to one, 2 scripts to another.

    The days of the mid-range film for new writers is gone. They're either based on IPs, true stories or from established writers or selected Nicholl winners. I wish this wasn't true, but from everything I see and hear, it is. You need to write accordingly.
    Well this is well argued and backed up with actually doing the job and experience. I don't deny you're wrong. I thought this already.

    My point was simply saying this. I know how to write super cheap but there are so many blumhouse movies that could be 4 million or 40 million depending on some subtle choices like casting, etc.... I'm trying to picture how on the page it's varies besides the obvious...

    I get it... but also I don't get it. They love the writing and the concept. Won't they (the reps) seek out the right buyers for it.

    BTW I would love to write those low budget movies. Those lifetime movie. That woudl be great.

    I am currently too stupid to figure out how Harry Met Sally the script couldn't be done for 5 million or 50 million if they wanted.

    I just never thought about the budget unless my friends were talking about making it ourselves.

    So let me have it. Thank you everyone.

    But I still believe in my heart a writer's job is to write the best story and thinking about budget will only give you writer's block.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by AnyOtherName View Post
    I mean, I agree that above all you should write what's in your heart, and I agree that you shouldn't concern yourself with 5 vs 10 set pieces in your action movie.

    BUT if you're brainstorming ideas for, say, a romcom that you want to sell to a studio, you need to understand that studios want to make CRAZY RICH ASIANS and not SET IT UP; that is, you need to specifically come up with settings and situations that take cash to pull off, because otherwise the consensus will be that your script is "just a Netflix movie."

    (Not that there's anything wrong with writing a Netflix movie! But those come with different sets of expectations of which you should be aware!)
    Fair point -- so are the Harry Met Sally movies dead? Like to me rom com should be super cheap -- and Crazy Rich was already IP.... yada yada... I don't know how to make a rom com a 100 million dollars without it being insane!

    What budgets are we avoiding? 30 -100 comedy million moves are dead?

    Leave a comment:


  • EdFury
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    I understand why things cost more money -- I'm saying -- I don't get the advice in spec land to worry about budget. Makes zero sense to me.

    I get big overall considerations. I'm writing a small indie movie or I'm writing a 100 million dollar action movie...

    But if you want to write a Fast and Furious movie and you're like well I can only have 7 set pieces... you're thinking way way way way ahead...

    Let me be clear. Don't worry about budget. I think that's a bad piece of advice.

    If you're writing a movie to make yourself -- then you think about budget. If a producer said she wants a 5 million dollar movie... then you think about budget.

    When you're unrepped or repped writer working on your own ideas, why the hell would you worry about anything but the best story?

    I stand by any idea can be made for zero dollars or a billion dollars. After you sell it than you can take out that helicopter shot they can't afford.

    And yes certain genres seem to be cheaper, but I don't know for sure if the budget of Longshot was less than John Wick 3. Seems like it would be, but doesn't mean it was...

    Anyway -- be skeptical of all sweeping advice like this (from me) and from people you've heard. We as humans tend to latch on to the last voice we hear or if we at all think someone is important, that their opinion is right. (just check out our last epic thread about one pros' opinion... you get it...)
    Trust me -- I had reps who were dead wrong about so many things.
    I wish this advice was true because it would be great to write 40 million dollar films. The problem? No one is making them in any significant numbers and even then they're mostly recognizable IPs. If one or two slip in a year, they're from established writers or writer / directors. Producers ARE looking for the next Hell or High Water which was written, according to Taylor Sheridan, as a 5 million dollar film. It ballooned to 12m with the attached talent.

    There are tons of producers with access to 1 to 5 million budgets. There are a lot fewer producers as you get past those figures. And screw managers who say they can't make money on sending out scripts in that range. I fired one about 10 seconds after he said that to me, sent the script to my agent who loved it and is shopping it. Look at who has writing assignments on studio films and where they came from originally. Successful low budget films.

    Of course you think about budget if you're trying to break in. It's about getting credits. It's about getting produced. I'll take the hundreds of producers who can make a low budget film over the maybe 25 that can make a 40 million dollar film every day. Those hundreds of producers won't even read a script with a 10+ million dollar budget because they dont have that kind of money. How do I know this? Talking to these producers who ask me what new I have in the 5 million range. Two calls yesterday. I send a pitch to one, 2 scripts to another.

    The days of the mid-range film for new writers is gone. They're either based on IPs, true stories or from established writers or selected Nicholl winners. I wish this wasn't true, but from everything I see and hear, it is. You need to write accordingly.

    Leave a comment:


  • AnyOtherName
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    I understand why things cost more money -- I'm saying -- I don't get the advice in spec land to worry about budget. Makes zero sense to me.

    I get big overall considerations. I'm writing a small indie movie or I'm writing a 100 million dollar action movie...

    But if you want to write a Fast and Furious movie and you're like well I can only have 7 set pieces... you're thinking way way way way ahead...

    Let me be clear. Don't worry about budget. I think that's a bad piece of advice.

    If you're writing a movie to make yourself -- then you think about budget. If a producer said she wants a 5 million dollar movie... then you think about budget.

    When you're unrepped or repped writer working on your own ideas, why the hell would you worry about anything but the best story?

    I stand by any idea can be made for zero dollars or a billion dollars. After you sell it than you can take out that helicopter shot they can't afford.

    And yes certain genres seem to be cheaper, but I don't know for sure if the budget of Longshot was less than John Wick 3. Seems like it would be, but doesn't mean it was...

    Anyway -- be skeptical of all sweeping advice like this (from me) and from people you've heard. We as humans tend to latch on to the last voice we hear or if we at all think someone is important, that their opinion is right. (just check out our last epic thread about one pros' opinion... you get it...)
    Trust me -- I had reps who were dead wrong about so many things.
    I mean, I agree that above all you should write what's in your heart, and I agree that you shouldn't concern yourself with 5 vs 10 set pieces in your action movie.

    BUT if you're brainstorming ideas for, say, a romcom that you want to sell to a studio, you need to understand that studios want to make CRAZY RICH ASIANS and not SET IT UP; that is, you need to specifically come up with settings and situations that take cash to pull off, because otherwise the consensus will be that your script is "just a Netflix movie."

    (Not that there's anything wrong with writing a Netflix movie! But those come with different sets of expectations of which you should be aware!)

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    I understand why things cost more money -- I'm saying -- I don't get the advice in spec land to worry about budget. Makes zero sense to me.

    I get big overall considerations. I'm writing a small indie movie or I'm writing a 100 million dollar action movie...

    But if you want to write a Fast and Furious movie and you're like well I can only have 7 set pieces... you're thinking way way way way ahead...

    Let me be clear. Don't worry about budget. I think that's a bad piece of advice.

    If you're writing a movie to make yourself -- then you think about budget. If a producer said she wants a 5 million dollar movie... then you think about budget.

    When you're unrepped or repped writer working on your own ideas, why the hell would you worry about anything but the best story?

    I stand by any idea can be made for zero dollars or a billion dollars. After you sell it than you can take out that helicopter shot they can't afford.

    And yes certain genres seem to be cheaper, but I don't know for sure if the budget of Longshot was less than John Wick 3. Seems like it would be, but doesn't mean it was...

    Anyway -- be skeptical of all sweeping advice like this (from me) and from people you've heard. We as humans tend to latch on to the last voice we hear or if we at all think someone is important, that their opinion is right. (just check out our last epic thread about one pros' opinion... you get it...)
    Trust me -- I had reps who were dead wrong about so many things.
    IDK... I hear what you guys are saying... and I've done it. My sci-fi was "I don't give a fukk, I'm writing what I'd want to see in that genre." People were like "This starts out big, then gets bigger, then biiiigger, then fukking BIGGER!" I have RAD set-pieces in it. But I honestly believe that even if people reading were like "FUKKING COOL!" they were keeping a tally in their head. By the end they were like "Yeah, WAY too big for us!"

    When I say 5 mil. I think I should make the distinction that I was mostly meaning if you're looking to also direct it [still a long shot], OR, have an up and comer direct it.

    But, yeah, if you're looking for a straight sale, Idk what the sweet spot is. But, I know it's not 100 mil. 40 mil opens it up to way more buyers.

    Again, like always, Idk what the fukk I'm talking about...

    Leave a comment:


  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    I listened to a podcast on Scripts & Scribes where one of the managers said they weren't interested in new writers with budgets below 5 million (i'll double check to be sure) because the manager doesn't make enough money to make it worth their time.

    Budget $5 million, Writer 2%= $100k, Manager = $10k.

    The amount of time it takes to develop a new writer isn't worth ten grand once or twice a year IF it sells.

    Also had a VP of Acquisitions at a production company tell me, "It takes the same amount of time to write a $40 million script as it does a $5 million dollar script, so why write the $5 million one." She told me to send any action thriller I write in that range.

    Seems to make some sense.
    If you suddenly remember which episode this was I'd like to check it out. Intel from many sources is always good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Feature or TV

    I understand why things cost more money -- I'm saying -- I don't get the advice in spec land to worry about budget. Makes zero sense to me.

    I get big overall considerations. I'm writing a small indie movie or I'm writing a 100 million dollar action movie...

    But if you want to write a Fast and Furious movie and you're like well I can only have 7 set pieces... you're thinking way way way way ahead...

    Let me be clear. Don't worry about budget. I think that's a bad piece of advice.

    If you're writing a movie to make yourself -- then you think about budget. If a producer said she wants a 5 million dollar movie... then you think about budget.

    When you're unrepped or repped writer working on your own ideas, why the hell would you worry about anything but the best story?

    I stand by any idea can be made for zero dollars or a billion dollars. After you sell it than you can take out that helicopter shot they can't afford.

    And yes certain genres seem to be cheaper, but I don't know for sure if the budget of Longshot was less than John Wick 3. Seems like it would be, but doesn't mean it was...

    Anyway -- be skeptical of all sweeping advice like this (from me) and from people you've heard. We as humans tend to latch on to the last voice we hear or if we at all think someone is important, that their opinion is right. (just check out our last epic thread about one pros' opinion... you get it...)
    Trust me -- I had reps who were dead wrong about so many things.

    Leave a comment:

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