Structure of TV pitch

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  • Structure of TV pitch

    I have been working on completing my TV pitch and would be very grateful if anyone could correct me about the correct structural base. Should I follow it in order?

    - Just writing the logline in the first page. (elevator pitch)

    - Second page will contain my name, contact details, genre, format then outlining the idea and how did I came up with that.

    - Then starting the series bible part: third page will contain in order the title of series, the logline (again), then 1 pharagraph synopsis (where is it set, what it is about, the main plot and subplots)

    - Then characters: Short biographies and descriptions, who they are, why they are important in the show, relationships with other characters, personalities, flaws, desires and goals. Their arc.

    - Story arc

    - Breakdown of pilot episode in order; Premise, Acts (mentioning which act structure is being followed like 3-5), Storylines, (naming each of them A, B, C, D, E etc... A is the main plot) Chacters introduced, setting, important motifs/details opening scene (teaser), inciting incident, main conflict, the turn, the twist, the big moment, closing scene.

    - What comes next: Questions that will need to be explained in other epsiodes

    - Very short summary of each episodes in season 1.

    - A brief summary of season 2 about how the story possibly progress.

    - Pilot script.

    -------------------------------------------------

    Other questions:

    1) Is it necessary to enrich the folder with images?
    2) Should I attach or mention about how it is copyrighted?
    3) How to tell apart clearly the turn, the twist and the big moment?

    Thank you for reading.
    Last edited by Otuken; 07-20-2021, 02:24 AM.

  • #2
    What exactly do you mean by "pitch." Do you have a meeting set up where you will meet in person or on Zoom? Or has someone requested further material after responding to your query and reading your pilot script?

    If not, and if you are in the first stage of the query process, you need a short, sweet and dynamic query letter (there are lots of good examples in this forum) and a killer logline for your pilot episode.

    If that gets you a request to read, you will need ONLY a fantastic pilot script to send.

    If that garners interest, then you can think about the presentation of all the other stuff--half of what you list is unnecessary. You might want to research series treatments at that juncture but none of it matters if your pilot script doesn't deliver. Nobody wants to read a bunch of explanatory material about some elongated story that hasn't already wowed them with the characters, dialogue and storyline in the introductory episode.

    Generally, only produced/successful TV writers can sell a concept without a great pilot script ready to go.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Cooper View Post
      What exactly do you mean by "pitch." Do you have a meeting set up where you will meet in person or on Zoom? Or has someone requested further material after responding to your query and reading your pilot script?

      If not, and if you are in the first stage of the query process, you need a short, sweet and dynamic query letter (there are lots of good examples in this forum) and a killer logline for your pilot episode.

      If that gets you a request to read, you will need ONLY a fantastic pilot script to send.

      If that garners interest, then you can think about the presentation of all the other stuff--half of what you list is unnecessary. You might want to research series treatments at that juncture but none of it matters if your pilot script doesn't deliver. Nobody wants to read a bunch of explanatory material about some elongated story that hasn't already wowed them with the characters, dialogue and storyline in the introductory episode.

      Generally, only produced/successful TV writers can sell a concept without a great pilot script ready to go.

      I haven't share it with anyone so nobody requested any meeting.

      Do they accept query letter from the outside? I don't live in the US but ready to come of course. The logline is ready and the pilot episode is almost completed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Otuken View Post


        I haven't share it with anyone so nobody requested any meeting.

        Do they accept query letter from the outside? I don't live in the US but ready to come of course. The logline is ready and the pilot episode is almost completed.
        With email, you could be anywhere -- across the street or halfway around the world. You should know, however, though screenwriters can live outside of "Hollywood," TV writers generally cannot as they need to be on hand for meetings.

        So, finish the pilot and polish both the pilot and the logline until they gleam, then work on your query letter to managers -- since that will need to be your first stop. And I agree with what others said: enter a TV pilot contest.

        Question:
        Are you working on a drama or a comedy? If the latter, is the pilot between 52 and 60 pages? 54-55 pages is a good number to aim for.

        I suggest you post your logline here (in the logline sub-forum) so that others can assist you with making it the best it can be.

        Good luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Cooper View Post

          With email, you could be anywhere -- across the street or halfway around the world. You should know, however, though screenwriters can live outside of "Hollywood," TV writers generally cannot as they need to be on hand for meetings.

          So, finish the pilot and polish both the pilot and the logline until they gleam, then work on your query letter to managers -- since that will need to be your first stop. And I agree with what others said: enter a TV pilot contest.

          Question:
          Are you working on a drama or a comedy? If the latter, is the pilot between 52 and 60 pages? 54-55 pages is a good number to aim for.

          I suggest you post your logline here (in the logline sub-forum) so that others can assist you with making it the best it can be.

          Good luck.
          I would do my best to live in any place as long as my script is accepted. After finishing the pilot, would you suggest me to contact with managers as second step or entering TV pilot contests?

          It is drama and I aim to make the pilot 45 minutes long. Is it better to stretch it to1 hour assuming each page represents 1 minutes?

          I would want to share the logline after copyright it. Any suggested good and cheap copyrighting medhods?

          Thanks for the helps.

          Comment


          • #6
            Start here: U.S. Copyright Office
            "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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