How to Write a Scene in 7 Min -- Emily Carmichael

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  • How to Write a Scene in 7 Min -- Emily Carmichael

    It's worth a gander.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoM-tQOOcPw

    This might be a cure for writer's block. Create your prompt and hit it.
    "Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist,- Pablo Picasso

  • #2
    Interesting approach.

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    • #3
      I think she's too shy about directing the director.

      I like her other points about character interactions and how the interactions move the story forward.

      And what does this mean "she clocks the surrounding police--"

      Thanks for posting this.


      Hey! You might do it in your house, but in this house we don't lick our butts. -- Mother Teresa

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mark Somers View Post

        And what does this mean "she clocks the surrounding police--"
        It means "she notices the surrounding police."

        I've seen it used in a couple Brian Helgeland scripts. Definitely "Man on Fire." Maybe "Legend."

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        • #5
          When you say you have someone clocked it means you are able to anticipate behavior because you have studied their routine. We use it in the poker world all the time. In this instance I took it to mean that she took in their current posture. Ready to attack? Not noticing her? What is their current state of mind?

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          • #6
            I like how she is creating a "moment" for us to witness. A moment is something we want to eavesdrop on. If you were at your local grocery store and the lady in front of you was making small talk with the cashier about the weather you wouldn't pay attention, it may even annoy you. But if the lady was there to confront the cashier for sleeping with her husband, we'd hang on every word and want to see how this plays out. In amateur scripts you see scenes created because info must come out for logistics of the story and there is no real moment happening in the scene and those are the scenes our peers will tell us we are being too on the nose here.

            In a well-written, professional script you are eavesdropping on moment after moment after moment with no end till the last scene. That's not to say you can't have soft, reflective scenes but there still has to be a moment present, the second there is no real moment present then it is so recognizable. Sometimes you don't know what the moment is, as a matter of fact there is definitely a point where you won't have the moment for the scene and you need to create one. It was cool to watch a pro writer's approach to create that moment from facts just thrown at her and she was on a 7 minute clock. She did lots of rewriting or "circling back" I think is what she called it. Where as she got deeper into the scene and had the characters mindset down better, she'd go back and layer in some narrative to reinforce, to world build. Worth watching twice.

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            • #7
              Thanks.


              Hey! You might do it in your house, but in this house we don't lick our butts. -- Mother Teresa

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