Nicholl 2009

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • rumely
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    I would also like to know if Galahad would have been disqualified. I have a script "inspired by" a public domain short fantasy story (6 pages) that is over 100 years old. My version is completely different (the original didn't even have dialogue). Only the set up and a couple early plot points are shared. I suppose my question is this: When does "inspired by" become "adapted from"?

    Rumely

    Leave a comment:

  • 12916studios
    Member

  • 12916studios
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Ah, I see... Well, I hope that my script will be engrossing enough that the 145 pages will fly right by.

    And when I said dense, I ddidn't mean dense in action, I meant dense thematically. The only think I could equate it too in terms of density is the recent Pilot of Kings. While a lot does happen, a lot is also said about the human condition.

    And on that note, I must go back to rewriting.

    Leave a comment:

  • gregbeal
    Member

  • gregbeal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by 12916studios View Post
    The longest script to ever win ther Nicholls was 153 in length, if memory serves me.
    Yes, but it was a 153 page script written in Glenn Caron's down the page, tons of white space Moonlighting style. The Moonlighting scripts tended to be in the 90-page area. Despite their length, these scripts were fast, easy reads.

    A dense 145 page script will probably read slowly, which can be a problem for some readers.

    Liking to read long scripts is considerably different than being a reader expecting scripts most often to be in the 90-110 range.

    Leave a comment:

  • 12916studios
    Member

  • 12916studios
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    I guess it's just me then. I would have no problem reading a 200 page script. I mean, my first reaction would be "wow, that's long", but I wouldn't let it effect the merits of the script. That's how I reacted to Benjamin Button, and I read the long version, but in the end, and through out reading, I loved it. The length actually made sense.

    Honestly, I think the longer scripts tend to be better written. It's definitely true when it comes to TV pilot scripts that the longer ones are invariably better.

    And yeah, I'm going on 6 months of nonstop work. I've literally poured sweat and tears into it, and if I remember correctly, possibly blood at one point too. I put parts of my life on hold to finish the first draft. I stopped watching five hours of TV a night, and was lucky if I even got one in. For me, that's like suddenly not being allowed to breath.

    Leave a comment:

  • lucidimage
    Regular

  • lucidimage
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Oh yeah, don't get me wrong- like I said, long scripts have won Nicholl. But my simple question would be, look at the first impression you give your reader. It is the first impression, they will look at the page count. What do you think their first reaction will be? Positive?

    Best of luck with the script, sounds like you have poured a lot into it. I'm not trying to knock you. I just saw the question and from other readers I have talked to or listened to, page count's a big deal.

    Leave a comment:

  • 12916studios
    Member

  • 12916studios
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    The longest script to ever win ther Nicholls was 153 in length, if memory serves me.

    Honestly, my script is so long because it is necessary for the full progression of the storyline. I mean, would I love it to be 120? Yes. Could it ever be? Not at all. I knew going into the project that it would be very long.

    And I think that it's "pretty darn captivating"... At least I hope it is.

    Leave a comment:

  • lucidimage
    Regular

  • lucidimage
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    12916- I will let Mr. B give you a detailed answer, but off the cuff- a reader could get a negative impression of a 120 page script as being a lil long as far as first impressions go. 145 is really, really long.

    I can only assume any reader would be very put out at getting a script that long. I think some would argue there is no reason to ever get a script to that length as many "Epic" films never even reached that level.

    But I think people have won Nicholl before with longer scripts- but it would probably have to be pretty darn captivating to keep someone on it that long.

    Again- just from what I know. Mr. Beal will have a much better answer.

    Leave a comment:

  • 12916studios
    Member

  • 12916studios
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Thanks for that bit of info on the unusual or challenging scripts, Greg. I know the one I am entering is so dense at times that it gets hard to follow. It all makes sense in the end, but it's definitely a challange, and pretty hard to explain.

    Also, I know that one of the FAQs on the comp site talks about page length, but I'd like to hear in your own words. How bad is it if a script runs long? Right now I'm trying to get my script down to about 145, and was wondering if there would be immediate negative respone to such a length.

    Leave a comment:

  • gregbeal
    Member

  • gregbeal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by marcal View Post
    Greg, can you please clarify two things...

    1) I understand that in the first round if you get three reads, your top two scores are what count. Is the same true in the quarterfinal (top two scores out of three reads) and semifinal rounds (maybe the top three scores out of four reads)? Or do ALL your scores count in those rounds?

    2) If I'm not mistaken, you posted recently that you encourage the readers to tell you if they think it's possible that they may have not fully "gotten" or grasped an entry that they've read, and that those scripts may get an extra read because of that. Could you elaborate on that a little bit?

    I'm asking about the above issues because the script I'm entering is both politically charged and unusual, something like a Participant Productions-type script rejiggered by Charlie Kaufman (sounds like a must-read, I know), and I'm wondering what the overall subjectivity-calculus may be. I know you've had political and/or strange scripts do well before, and that the overall quality of the story and script is of course what should shine through regardless of anything else, but I just wanted to know a little more about these issues before I embark on a last rewrite.

    Thanks...
    While I won't explain exactly how scoring works, it is a "best X of Y" throughout the competition, and all the scores less several do count towards reaching the finals. Yes, a script can reach the finals with a judge or two not appreciating it at all.

    Yes, I do encourage readers to tell me that they didn't get a script. Often, that script will receive a second read despite a low score. Readers have asked me to give a script a second read despite assigning it a low score.

    So many unusual scripts have done well over the years - advancing, reaching the finals and winning - that I don't think I would worry that much about entering an "unusual" or challenging script into the competition.

    Leave a comment:


  • marcal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Greg, can you please clarify two things...

    1) I understand that in the first round if you get three reads, your top two scores are what count. Is the same true in the quarterfinal (top two scores out of three reads) and semifinal rounds (maybe the top three scores out of four reads)? Or do ALL your scores count in those rounds?

    2) If I'm not mistaken, you posted recently that you encourage the readers to tell you if they think it's possible that they may have not fully "gotten" or grasped an entry that they've read, and that those scripts may get an extra read because of that. Could you elaborate on that a little bit?

    I'm asking about the above issues because the script I'm entering is both politically charged and unusual, something like a Participant Productions-type script rejiggered by Charlie Kaufman (sounds like a must-read, I know), and I'm wondering what the overall subjectivity-calculus may be. I know you've had political and/or strange scripts do well before, and that the overall quality of the story and script is of course what should shine through regardless of anything else, but I just wanted to know a little more about these issues before I embark on a last rewrite.

    Thanks...

    Leave a comment:

  • lucidimage
    Regular

  • lucidimage
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by gregbeal View Post
    Snippets are okay. Adaptation is not.
    Random question based on this- would say a script such as GALAHAD have been disqualified? It is a unique story that is obviously exceptionally well executed but it was based on existing (albeit public domain) characters and themes. So would it have been disqualified dispite being such a great script for not being 100% original content?

    Leave a comment:

  • 12916studios
    Member

  • 12916studios
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by gregbeal View Post
    I'm guessing we're speaking of two different people. Michele Hackman was the only female finalist (the other two female finalists became fellows) in 2003. If the visiting writer wasn't Michele, perhaps she was a semi or quarterfinalist in 2003, or she was a finalist in another year.

    On the other hand, when you read Michele's finalist script, you knew she could be a novelist. It was exceedingly rich in detail, sprawled over generations and featured a multitude of characters.
    Maybe she wasn't a finalist, and I misheard her.

    Leave a comment:

  • peasblossom
    Member

  • peasblossom
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Thanks Greg! Some of them are long snippets, because they are actors doing a scene - but the movie(s) are definitely not adaptations of the works.

    Leave a comment:

  • gregbeal
    Member

  • gregbeal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by peasblossom View Post
    This may have been asked before, but on reading the rules listed at the Nicholl website, I need to ask. If you have a script with excerpts of Shakespeare plays in it (because the main characters are actors), does that disqualify the script? How about excerpts from other plays that are not in the common domain? Also, if the script includes song lyrics, will that disqualify it? All snippets of Shakespeare, and other playwrights, and also song lyrics are not presented as the screenwriter's words - in the world of the script they are parts of an existing play or song that the characters are either quoting or acting in.
    Snippets are okay. Adaptation is not.

    Leave a comment:

  • peasblossom
    Member

  • peasblossom
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    This may have been asked before, but on reading the rules listed at the Nicholl website, I need to ask. If you have a script with excerpts of Shakespeare plays in it (because the main characters are actors), does that disqualify the script? How about excerpts from other plays that are not in the common domain? Also, if the script includes song lyrics, will that disqualify it? All snippets of Shakespeare, and other playwrights, and also song lyrics are not presented as the screenwriter's words - in the world of the script they are parts of an existing play or song that the characters are either quoting or acting in.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X