Nicholl 2009

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  • Erehwon
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Man, that's huge. Can you believe, making it to the semi-finals? That would put you in like the top 120, or so, I think. That alone should make you feel pretty f'n good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Greg said it would be over 6,300.

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  • joe78
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    It's official, my screenplay is in competition...

    I suspect I was one of the very last to submit.

    Anyone catch word of what the final application # is?....

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by cyberian exile View Post
    Another reason contests should be anonymous: a few years ago I was in a fairly prominent contest which is one of the few that requires personal information to be included on the title page.

    I was surprised when one of the early-round readers called me at home to discuss my script -- while the contest was still running. She wanted to tell me how much she loved my script, and she wanted me to read hers and give her feedback. How awkward. Needless to say, I told her this was not cool, and reported this to the contest director. After I won the Nicholl, she called me again, and continued to do so until I moved and changed my phone number. (She wanted my help getting an agent).

    Also, when the Nicholl finalists were announced in Variety a couple of the readers in the other, non-anonymous contest realized that they had both my Nicholl script and a different script of mine (both of which became finalists in the contest), and they called me, trying to "help" me with my career. Even if they'd had no ulterior motives, this is not ethical. I kept asking them, how did you get a copy of my script? How did you get my contact information (my phone number was unlisted)? They wouldn't say. It wasn't until months afterward that I found out they'd read for Contest X.

    I'm sure there are some writers who "accidently" leave their contact information on contest scripts, because they naively believe including contact information is a good way to allow producers, reps, and such the opportunity to contact them. But consider this: if an early-round reader finds a script that's GREAT, and they have all the writer's contact information, don't you think a reader with more ambition than ethics might be motivated to give the script a low score? After all, if the script were to advance in the contest, more important industry people would be reading it, and the early-round judge wouldn't have a snowball's chance of signing that writer.

    Whereas, if the contest is anonymous, the reader HAS to give high scores to the best scripts, because only the finalists tend to have their contact information revealed.


    This is very interesting.

    There are instances however when a contest will use "you can contact the writer after the contest is over" as bait to get readers. In that regard, when the contact information is furnished to the reader after the contest is over, I have no problem with it. I've had readers contact me after contests were over to congratulate me and ask if they could "shop around" my screenplay. Of course, nothing has ever come from that, but at least it was a confidence boost for me and everyone who has contacted me (though bottom feeders) seemed sincere in their praise of my screenplays and their interest in seeing them made into films.

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  • cyberian exile
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    What's "American Idol"? Never heard of it.

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  • Sinnycal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by Charisma View Post
    Barnabas is that 'The World's Most Interesting Man' dude.
    I'm declaring this official canon.

    Leave a comment:


  • cyberian exile
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Another reason contests should be anonymous: a few years ago I was in a fairly prominent contest which is one of the few that requires personal information to be included on the title page.

    I was surprised when one of the early-round readers called me at home to discuss my script -- while the contest was still running. She wanted to tell me how much she loved my script, and she wanted me to read hers and give her feedback. How awkward. Needless to say, I told her this was not cool, and reported this to the contest director. After I won the Nicholl, she called me again, and continued to do so until I moved and changed my phone number. (She wanted my help getting an agent).

    Also, when the Nicholl finalists were announced in Variety a couple of the readers in the other, non-anonymous contest realized that they had both my Nicholl script and a different script of mine (both of which became finalists in the contest), and they called me, trying to "help" me with my career. Even if they'd had no ulterior motives, this is not ethical. I kept asking them, how did you get a copy of my script? How did you get my contact information (my phone number was unlisted)? They wouldn't say. It wasn't until months afterward that I found out they'd read for Contest X.

    I'm sure there are some writers who "accidently" leave their contact information on contest scripts, because they naively believe including contact information is a good way to allow producers, reps, and such the opportunity to contact them. But consider this: if an early-round reader finds a script that's GREAT, and they have all the writer's contact information, don't you think a reader with more ambition than ethics might be motivated to give the script a low score? After all, if the script were to advance in the contest, more important industry people would be reading it, and the early-round judge wouldn't have a snowball's chance of signing that writer.

    Whereas, if the contest is anonymous, the reader HAS to give high scores to the best scripts, because only the finalists tend to have their contact information revealed.

    Last edited by cyberian exile; 05-21-2009, 02:09 AM. Reason: clarity

    Leave a comment:


  • Harbinger
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    I could be wrong but that sounded very close to a *spoiler* for all us Brits who only get to see the final of American Idol tonight.

    If so....keep it zipped!




    PS. Brief apology for the slight thread derailment

    Leave a comment:


  • Charisma
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by Harbinger View Post
    Barnabas Papardo?! I know him. He's one of those goddamn cigar chomping meh-he-co's. Sombrero wearing, moustached, maraca wavers the lot of 'em!

    No? Not him? Oh I know who he is. He's that Spanish writer, right? Constantly swigging Sangria! How can I possibly read a script by someone who comes from a country that endorses bull-fighting!?

    And he's clearly a man too. I hate men. They tend to look at me funny!


    All the above would be my ham-fisted way of making a point

    Imagine a chauvinist reader, who believes the best action scripts are only ever written by men, suddenly gets DIE HARDLY by Patricia Daisycup slapped on his desk.
    Barnabas is that 'The World's Most Interesting Man' dude. Last I heard his piece 'Stay Thirsty My Friends' was the dark horse ridden by A. Lambert.

    Leave a comment:


  • Harbinger
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    As nikee said.

    My post earlier was meant as lighthearted commentary on why contests should be anonymous. Hope it didn't offend....although men do look at me funny. But that may be the manga-spike haircut I insist on sporting.

    But I remember reading an article a while back from a contest organizer.

    And the reason for anonymity is the subconscious stereotypes all of us build up and also the instant impression we get when a name doesn't fit the style or genre.

    And funnily enough it was a Mexican theme used in the article. The contest organizer, at one time, allowed names on the cover page. Until he had a reader come back to him. He had two scripts based around a western theme of revenge (a la Unforgiven) both based in Mexico, and he found himself leaning towards the Mexican writer purely based on name. Because in his head somewhere the Mexican/Spanish name somehow validated that script over the other.

    I wish I could remember the article or the name of the contest. But ultimately from that day on they insisted on anonymous entries.

    Because we just can't help ourselves and if you're absolutely honest, the most enlightened among us, if only for a second, might baulk at a script entitled-

    "KILL DEATH KILL"
    by
    Petula Tara-Beckworth the third.

    Just as you might worry for a second if you received-

    "THE REAL FUHRER"
    by
    Klaus Von Zimmerman

    or doubt the authenticity of-

    "MY LIFE IN THE GHETTO"
    by
    Sir Cuthbert .B. Saddlebottom


    We all have inherent prejudices. Even if they're on a subconscious level and last merely seconds before our rational side kicks us into touch.

    Leave a comment:


  • NikeeGoddess
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    I've never entirely understood that logic, to be honest.
    also some people post their scripts online making them available for anyone to see. not that that's a big problem but what if you posted script pages HERE and the response was... well, let me say, might sway someone's opinion. maybe they don't remember where they read it before but... no one liked it.

    and it IS possible to know other writers. maybe you met one at the EXPO. and then you read her script.

    and what harbinger said - but you could put any name (or sex) in there and sway someone's opinion. it sometimes happens subconsciously.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheKeenGuy
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by gregbeal View Post
    It's been in the rules and the FAQs for years. Overlooked by hundreds and hundreds year in and out.

    We expect entrants to read the rules.

    Information within the application was intended to be in addition to all that was provided earlier.

    Unless we put it in 64 pt, it would still be overlooked by some and ignored by others.
    I agree. I don't believe that it's Nicholl's fault that so many people submitting online didn't follow the rules (one-third, was it?).

    I'm just suggesting that with the giant headache that those writers' carelessness caused you this year, it might be in your interest to make that disclaimer on the final upload page garishly conspicuous next year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Harbinger
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by Sinnycal View Post
    I've never entirely understood that logic, to be honest.

    Tell me that your name is Barnabas Papardo and you're still anonymous because I have no idea who that is. And if you happen to have a friend reading scripts for a contest, they could recognize your title or logline or anything else just as easily as your name.
    Barnabas Papardo?! I know him. He's one of those goddamn cigar chomping meh-he-co's. Sombrero wearing, moustached, maraca wavers the lot of 'em!

    No? Not him? Oh I know who he is. He's that Spanish writer, right? Constantly swigging Sangria! How can I possibly read a script by someone who comes from a country that endorses bull-fighting!?

    And he's clearly a man too. I hate men. They tend to look at me funny!


    All the above would be my ham-fisted way of making a point

    Imagine a chauvinist reader, who believes the best action scripts are only ever written by men, suddenly gets DIE HARDLY by Patricia Daisycup slapped on his desk.
    Last edited by Harbinger; 05-20-2009, 07:46 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sinnycal
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    Originally posted by NikeeGoddess View Post
    i don't get that. don't people know that nearly ALL the script competitions ask you to remove your name so the judging can remain anonymous?!!!
    I've never entirely understood that logic, to be honest.

    Tell me that your name is Barnabas Papardo and you're still anonymous because I have no idea who that is. And if you happen to have a friend reading scripts for a contest, they could recognize your title or logline or anything else just as easily as your name.

    Leave a comment:


  • NikeeGoddess
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2009

    i don't get that. don't people know that nearly ALL the script competitions ask you to remove your name so the judging can remain anonymous?!!!

    anyhoo - i say just disqualify those folks. makes my chances that much better.

    Leave a comment:

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