Script Consultants

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  • Script Consultants

    I'd like to hear from people who you have liked and why. Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Script Consultants

    Andrew Hilton the Screenplay Mechanic. http://screenplaymechanic.com/

    Great guy, great notes, and cheap as hell.

    Accomplished writer and now producer you can't beat him. Top notch.
    Introduce a little anarchy.

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    • #3
      Re: Script Consultants

      Thanks for the reply Burning. I'll check out his website.So many consultants out there, it's hard to know who to choose.

      Any others from people? Anyone have thoughts on Pilar Alessandra and whether her service is worth it? Or Michael Hauge? I know Hauge charges a lot, so is his service that much better?

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      • #4
        Re: Script Consultants

        Michael Hauge is fantastic. The Producers brought him on the project. His consultation with ways to move the story forward were excellent, lifting the script to the next level. We've got another couple of hours with him this week on the latest draft before we hit pre-production. Invaluable.

        Good luck with it.

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        • #5
          Re: Script Consultants

          Scott the Reader

          Barb Doyon

          And Andrew at the Script Mechanic, already linked. All relatively inexpensive, all excellent.
          Patrick Sweeney

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          • #6
            Re: Script Consultants

            super -

            I'm sure Pilar and Hauge are great script analysts. But if you are a newer writer, with a new script, and you haven't gotten any professional feedback on it yet, don't spend that kind of money right off the bat. Go with someone much more affordable first, just to see what kind of feedback you get.

            If you're a more experienced writer, and you've already gotten some positive, knowledgeable feedback on the script, and you just want to take it to the next level, and you have money to spare, then maybe go for somebody like that.

            Just my 2 cents.
            "The Hollywood film business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." Hunter S Thompson

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            • #7
              Re: Script Consultants

              thanks cshel - that's good advice and along the lines of my thinking.

              and thank you patrick and one_seven for your responses as well.

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              • #8
                Re: Script Consultants

                If you decide never to pay, you're in good company.

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                • #9
                  Re: Script Consultants

                  Originally posted by supereasy View Post
                  I'd like to hear from people who you have liked and why. Thanks

                  Of course everyone is going to have a different experience, and each script will bring about different types of feedback, but I was extremely impressed with Carson Reeves and the feedback he gave me. I really think he helped me improve several of my screenplays.

                  For me, if you can help me improve my screenplay, I'll pay you. Whatever it takes to get good feedback, I am willing to do it. Within my budget of course.



                  http://scriptshadow.blogspot.com/

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                  • #10
                    Re: Script Consultants

                    Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
                    If you decide never to pay, you're in good company.
                    Jeff Lowell: Keeping Done Deal honest since '63.

                    HH

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                    • #11
                      Re: Script Consultants

                      Originally posted by one seven spectrum View Post
                      Michael Hauge is fantastic. The Producers brought him on the project. His consultation with ways to move the story forward were excellent, lifting the script to the next level. We've got another couple of hours with him this week on the latest draft before we hit pre-production. Invaluable.

                      Good luck with it.
                      Michael Hauge--he wrote the first book on screenwriting I ever bought, and for my money, still one of the best. Good to hear he's still doing good.

                      http://www.pjmcilvaine.com/

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                      • #12
                        Re: Script Consultants

                        I agree about Michael Hauge's book. It is one of about two dozen I've read, and it was one of the better ones.


                        For those of you who think "paying" someone to give you feedback on your scripts is a waste of money, I highly entreat you to reconsider. It's just a matter of finding the right people, with the right skill set. Yes, there will be the occasion when you pay for feedback and the feedback is crap. But if one in five times you get good feedback, you can be happy to improve your screenplay.
                        Last edited by KenRichards; 07-20-2011, 05:31 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Script Consultants

                          Part of the learning process of a writer is to develop a network of fellow writers from whom you receive and give notes. This will not only make you a better writer but a better note-giver.

                          And maybe you will reach a Peter Principle of ability. But the idea is that you add and drop people from your writing circles as you grow as a writer and increase your commitment to the craft. You will know if you are becoming a better writer/note-giver if people within your circle start placing in contests, landing representation, getting options, and eventually becoming full-time WGA writers.

                          Sure you can use paid consultants. But that is avoiding a crucial part of the writer's learning process. And before you can say "But I don't know anyone." or "All my writing friends aren't very good" or whatever, just know that you have to be like The Karate Kid and learn how to paint the fence, sand the floor, and wax on wax off before you can move up.

                          Now if once a year, you want to fling a script in the Nicholl or get $50 feedback from The Script Mechanic (not sure if that's his rate), then fine. But as a routine, I don't think using script consultants to get feedback is a necessary practice.

                          ETA: By the way, every time you are reading someone's script to give notes or vice versa, you are NETWORKING. Like 95 percent of networking, it may be a one-time thing or doesn't pan out. However, you will find that the writers who move up in ability with you will be the most honest and gung-ho fans of your work. Paid consultants are fans of your work only so far as they'll get repeat business and/or referrals to other writers who will hire them.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Script Consultants

                            Hamboogul, I respectfully have to challenge a couple of your points:

                            First, developing a writers network certainly makes sense if you live in LA or where there's a community of passionate, committed screenwriters. That's just not always an option.

                            Second, since you referred to Screenplay Mechanic (and obviously never used him) you would know he does not sugar coat his notes so you come back or refer him to others. Yes, others 'consultants' I have used do that and were at least twice as expensive. BUT, for the record, it's clear from Screenplay Mechaic's notes, he could care less if your offended and don't come back. He's fair, honest, reasonable, but ALWAYS tells it the way he he sees it, and has more than enough clients not to worry about someone's hurt feelings. He's given us an emphatic 'thumbs down' more times than a 'thumbs up' (often with reservations).

                            And, I have to add, right now we have scripts into a couple of top production companies because of the Mechanic's notes, and also because of his willingness to support work he's enthused about well beyond the $80 he charges without any prospect of further gain. Yes, that's rare, almost unbelievable, but it's true.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Script Consultants

                              Originally posted by Storytell View Post
                              Hamboogul, I respectfully have to challenge a couple of your points:

                              First, developing a writers network certainly makes sense if you live in LA or where there's a community of passionate, committed screenwriters. That's just not always an option.

                              Second, since you referred to Screenplay Mechanic (and obviously never used him) you would know he does not sugar coat his notes so you come back or refer him to others. Yes, others 'consultants' I have used do that and were at least twice as expensive. BUT, for the record, it's clear from Screenplay Mechaic's notes, he could care less if your offended and don't come back. He's fair, honest, reasonable, but ALWAYS tells it the way he he sees it, and has more than enough clients not to worry about someone's hurt feelings. He's given us an emphatic 'thumbs down' more times than a 'thumbs up' (often with reservations).

                              And, I have to add, right now we have scripts into a couple of top production companies because of the Mechanic's notes, and also because of his willingness to support work he's enthused about well beyond the $80 he charges without any prospect of further gain. Yes, that's rare, almost unbelievable, but it's true.
                              I don't know The Mechanic so I'll give you that. Plus, everyone here speaks highly of him. But the first part...

                              You can post script pages on Done Deal. There's the logline forum. How the heck do you think some of these relationships are formed? Yes, you can move to LA. But now with the internet, you don't even have to meet to be writing partners.

                              Jeff Lowell may correct me if I'm wrong. But a decade ago, Bill Marsillii interacted with Terry Rossio online. I wanna say AOL chatroom or something. They formed a friendship. And then they worked on a script together called DEJA VU that sold for $5 million dollars. Now that's the most exemplary case of an online meeting gone well. But there are plenty of examples on DD where a virtual group is formed from friendship/note-exchange. So I don't buy the first part of your explanation at all.

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