My Page Awards "Success" Story.

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bunker
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    A bad script is a bad script. But reader subjectivity can often be the difference between a "meh" script and a "I loved it!" script.

    A few years ago, I entered a script in Nicholl and it came back with the "Close... you were in the next 100 before the QFs." So, the script was the in the top ~350 scripts. Not bad. I worked on other projects for the next year, but figured it was worth giving that script another shot. Maybe a QF placement could give it some momentum. Results came in... no QFs. No "next 100." No Top 10%, 15%, or 20%. Nothing. Essentially, that same script went from ~350 all the way past 2200. And I don't think the overall quality of Nicholl went up that much.

    And that's Nicholl. A contest I have immense respect for. It's professionalism is beyond reproach.

    Also, my script that has the most momentum (optioned and currently in the hands of talent) has never placed in a contest. It's very dark, but it really speaks to some people.

    But this all points to the importance of managers and agents. Everyone needs someone who can get our scripts in the RIGHT hands. Someone who knows who is receptive to what, and who is looking for what.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1mper1um
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by Harbinger View Post
    Gotta say MCuk, for someone so new to this forum, you have an almost admirably egregious attitude. Some might even regard it as arrogance. It's gonna really alienate you in a networking, it's-who-you-know industry.

    First of all, despite your thinly-veiled, almost passive-aggressive attempt to impugn the reputation of the PAGE contest, they remain one of the best contests out there (second only to Nicholl). And, though you have been successful in I assume optioning your script, I take their verdict over that of this phantom independent producer you mentioned. If your script didn't advance, subjective though it is, maybe it isn't very good.

    Either way, that you assume the fact your wonderful opus didn't advance is due to being read by a single mom is not only arrogant beyond belief, but nicely offensive to single moms into the bargain. An upbringing that I spewed forth from.

    I also remember a post from you talking of how you wouldn't help anyone or impart wisdom (what a overwhelming loss) on the basis that you don't want to help anyone else get an assignment you may both be vying for in the future. Frankly I can't begin to voice how much that attitude stinks.

    Bottom line, you didn't advance because the script didn't click with the qualified reader in this case. As everyone always says, it's entirely subjective. Interesting though that, despite being rejected by Fox and Paramount, you question your rejection by PAGE. I hope your script character logic doesn't match your own in any way.

    All that said, I wish you luck with the assignment. I hope, as someone else has mentioned, through the process you learn some humility. Then maybe some day you'll realize that casting libelous barbs about a contest, based on nothing more than hurt pride, is not only juvenile and arrogant in the extreme, but detrimental to how you develop and how others perceive you.

    Peace... out.
    Hell yeah!

    Leave a comment:


  • Why One
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Agree with what BDZ and SB said -- at least it has been from my limited experience, even if I do live a world's away from Hollywood. I have received lots of "love" for my work over the years, so much so that I've become numb to it and think they're lying. Until they actually work to develop material with me, slip it on to contacts, or put money where their mouths are, it is all smoke blowing.

    Reminds me another story from TALES FROM THE SCRIPT where Bruce Joel Rubin, after having written GHOST, walked out of a commissary with some executives that told him, "Bruce, we just want to tell you that your script is the best script we have ever read." Obviously Bruce was blown away by this. A week later, Bruce was walking out of the same commissary and he saw the same executives walking another writer out and he overhead them say to him, "We just wanted to let you know that your script is the best script we have ever read."

    It has been said plenty of times that Hollywood is a town where you can die from encouragement.

    Leave a comment:


  • meemee2000
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by cvolante View Post
    I was kind of surprised everyone was tearing apart what the original poster had said.
    I think the reaction is due to the fact that it seemed like he was putting down the Page contest. Also, the message comes across as being whiny. A lot of us on this board have had really good scripts that didn't place in one or two particular contests for whatever reason so you're not going to see a lot of sympathy from us.
    Last edited by meemee2000; 07-22-2011, 12:59 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Geoff Alexander
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post
    One thing consistent with all the writers I hang out with...no one bothers saying people LOVED their script unless there is business attached to it.

    Seriously, this isn't a slam at all, but people will hate your script and tell you they loved it. People will read only the coverage on your script and tell you they loved it. If they're not trying to do anything with it or you, the opinion doesn't matter. If someone says, "I loved your script, not right for this company, but we have an assignment you'd be perfect for..." that's love.

    Sounds like the script is good and got you meetings but do your best to ignore people who "love" your work and pass. I used to believe that sh!t too when I was just starting out. Means nothing.
    Yep. If people really "love" your material, they will stalk you until they can take a position on the project. If they don't go after you, then they are blowing smoke up your ass.

    If a manager reads it and the say they love it but they don't express interest in signing you...they didn't love it.

    I was talking to a writer who told me that an agent at a certain agency told him his script was one of the best scripts she'd read. Yet she didn't sign him, or try to. He refused to believe that the script may not have actually been one of the best scripts she's read. He was an idiot.

    Leave a comment:


  • BattleDolphinZero
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    One thing consistent with all the writers I hang out with...no one bothers saying people LOVED their script unless there is business attached to it.

    Seriously, this isn't a slam at all, but people will hate your script and tell you they loved it. People will read only the coverage on your script and tell you they loved it. If they're not trying to do anything with it or you, the opinion doesn't matter. If someone says, "I loved your script, not right for this company, but we have an assignment you'd be perfect for..." that's love.

    Sounds like the script is good and got you meetings but do your best to ignore people who "love" your work and pass. I used to believe that sh!t too when I was just starting out. Means nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • grumpywriter
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Assuming it's true, I think if this story illustrates anything it's that it's just a matter of getting the right script into the right hands...

    Leave a comment:


  • cvolante
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Actually, single mom in Iowa comments aside, I was kind of surprised everyone was tearing apart what the original poster had said. It seems like he/she wrote a good script, got it optioned and the point is contest/schmontest. For him, he was successful anyway. It's hope for anyone who gets a disappointing letter from Mr. Beal et al.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richmond Weems
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by jeannie517 View Post
    And truly, no offense to those that place in contests, but how many contest winners are turning out to be working writers? Apples and oranges in a lot of cases.
    Well said. I mean, the whole thing, but especially the quote above. Go to moviebytes and you'll see interviews with winners of contests, then look at their "accomplishments" and you'll see a LOT of contests that the writer placed or won, but still struggle to land a rep.

    Contests are one way in, but it appears that a lot of people seem to make a career out of entering as many as they can, trying to be that big fish in the small pond. And they never seem to leave that pond.

    HH

    Leave a comment:


  • Manchester
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Sandra Bullock is a single mom. Ya think maybe she's one of the readers? Cool!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeannie517
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    I gotta' say, I agree with Harbinger. The tone of the original post is snarky and "sour grapes" and really pretty insulting...we get that you meant the single mom reference to mean someone who knows nothing about screenwriting, but you'd be surprised how many really talented writers (who need to earn $$$) live in podunk places because they are struggling writers that can't afford to live in LA. Contests are like a crap shoot -- you didn't complete a calculus exam where the answers are graded against the answer sheet. So going into a contest you've got to realize it's totally subjective. If you're going to enter one, realize you send the submission in and forget about it. There are no guarantees in life. It's totally dependent on who reads your work. And truly, no offense to those that place in contests, but how many contest winners are turning out to be working writers? Apples and oranges in a lot of cases. I'm writing a script this summer that I'm sending out to a handful of contests that I know it will be more appropriate for and where it will have a higher chance of placing -- and a greater chance of return on my time investment. Is it commercial? NO. Is it strong writing? From feedback, it appears to be. But I would only use it as a writing sample and not send out queries on it because I know it's not likely to attract anyone's attention in this market. So my point is, know what you're writing for. You got a deal going with this script you mentioned. Congrats. Focus on the positive and steer way clear of the negative as you seem to be wanting to do. But then if you truly believe that you don't want to give anyone else a leg up that could be vying for the same writing assignments as you....then advice to you is useless. Oh, and you didn't ask for my $.02 but maybe it will at least help to file your fangs down a little. Remember, this business is pretty small....and if you want to network, best to keep the snarkiness in check.

    Leave a comment:


  • justin
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by jcgary View Post
    (No reader worth sht cares about genre. If they're that unprofessional, then the contest is a joke from the start. The reader-doesn't-like-genre thing is an excuse peddled by screenwriters who get bad coverage. "Well, she just doesn't like action scripts." Really, really, trust me: that's not it. Your script just isn't that good.)
    If there really are readers so self-deluded that they think personal preferences (and prejudices) don't affect their ability to judge the merits of a script, then I wouldn't trust their opinion even on a genre they do like. Sure, they can probably spot the real turkeys in any genre - things that are just badly written. But the good from the merely competent? No. People should have personal responses to a work - they should get angry, frightened, excited, amused, heartbroken. That's part of the experience. But what people respond to will vary. I cannot judge horror movies because I don't respond to them (at least, not how the writer intends). I can't judge action scripts. What would I do? Say to myself 'if I were the sort of person who liked action films I would be excited by this even though it strike me as banal' (like most of the action movies I've seen)? Action movies and scripts don't do anything for me. The problem's with me, not the script. But at least I know that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Miko34
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    It definitely is who you get as a reader. Look at reviews on Rotten Tomatoes and Netflix. See how many people loved a certain movie and other people absolutely hated the same movie. Comedy especially is very subjective. Also, look at how many of the winners of contests actually get produced ... a small percentage. And some of those produced contest winners end up not getting great reviews by critics (although that could also be due to any number of factors during production).

    IMHO, all scripts in contests should be read by at least two different readers. If the two scores vary dramatically, then it should be read a third time. I just feel like there are probably great scripts that do get passed on. This also keeps the readers honest with their reviews because perhaps there are times when a reader skims through a script instead of reading it through properly. How can they tell if a reader is any good? Just by the coverage? You can fake coverage. I know this change won't happen with most contests because it takes too much time and costs too much money.

    One thing I will say about Page is that I don't think the short film and TV scripts should be in the same contest as the feature length. I know we're not supposed to enter a contest for the prize money, but let's be honest ... a 23 page short script most likely won't win the big $$ prize. And if it did ... a lot of feature film writers would probably be upset. If it were a separate contest, then the entrance fee for those scripts could also be lowered and I bet more people would enter their shorts or TV pilot scripts.

    That was slightly off topic, but yeah ... Congrats on the sale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richmond Weems
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    That's convinced me, Bobby. I'm gonna grow a mustache and HTFU.

    HH

    Leave a comment:


  • wildswan
    replied
    Re: My Page Awards "Success" Story.

    Originally posted by MCuk View Post
    Harbinger, even your own manager read it and loved it.

    Since he loved it so much, I'm assuming he signed you?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X