Nicholl 2019

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • finalact4
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by TigerFang View Post
    Just wear any of these to the set next time: MsFABulous
    yes, i believe that would do the trick. hilarious!

    Leave a comment:


  • Clint Hill
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by Iceman View Post
    What type of script does Nicholl prefer?
    Like everyone else in the movie industry and in the audience, they just want a script with a good story well told.
    Last edited by Clint Hill; 03-06-2019, 07:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Clint Hill
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    I spend YEARS not placing or winning. I believed that if I worked hard enough, listened to feedback and continued to improve that I would either start seeing results or just die with a giant stack of screenplays. There's nothing else I'm really good at. I've written 22 features over the course of 18 years. I would have written 23 and tried again this year. I've also been involved with my local filmmaking community and have been writing shorts to get experience in production and what a script really is in the "real world." My last short won dozens of festival awards and was incredibly fun to write, make and take out into the world and continued to fuel my enthusiasm for the film business. There's no magic way around it. I've said it before though... I'm a middle-aged, stay at home mom, self-taught with zero industry knowledge or contacts and didn't even start writing until I was 30. My road was not easy but I stayed on it. I hope you do too.



    W
    +1

    Leave a comment:


  • Clint Hill
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    i'm hesitant to tell this story, but i think women need to hear it--

    i will say, one thing that happened that i thought was the most disappointing. i was invited to a location set where they were filming a pilot and it was amazing. i really learned a lot just watching the actors, director and crew.

    i met one of the actors and we chatted about passion for our craft and how he got started and how i got started. a real nice, professional feeling conversation.

    it took me like 3 1/2 hours to get there, including a ferry, and after i left to go home, i got a call from my manager saying that the actor was really impressed with me and wanted to know if i would come back for to have dinner with him.

    i mean, he was trying to play it off like it was all innocent and funny, but he kept coming back around to getting me to travel back. this actor was in a very famous movie in the 80s, so he's like my father's age. i'd just spent almost 7 hours traveling. ugh.

    i finally had to say, "tell him i've got a boyfriend." he was pushing pretty hard and i felt very uncomfortable and when he pushed one last time, "so it's a no?" i said firmly, "yes, it's a no." i don't think i've ever been so insulted. i've dealt with that kind of **** my whole life. i learned a very good lesson, i think. i'll be more up front this next time with my expectations. i know he just wanted to make the actor happy, but damn, i'm not a ****ing booty call.

    anyway, i'm hoping this is a good year. right now i'm fortunate enough to be writing full time. not sure how long it will last, but busting my ass everyday to get as much writing in as possible.

    good luck to all.
    Just wear any of these to the set next time: MsFABulous

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    I spend YEARS not placing or winning. I believed that if I worked hard enough, listened to feedback and continued to improve that I would either start seeing results or just die with a giant stack of screenplays. There's nothing else I'm really good at. I've written 22 features over the course of 18 years. I would have written 23 and tried again this year. I've also been involved with my local filmmaking community and have been writing shorts to get experience in production and what a script really is in the "real world." My last short won dozens of festival awards and was incredibly fun to write, make and take out into the world and continued to fuel my enthusiasm for the film business. There's no magic way around it. I've said it before though... I'm a middle-aged, stay at home mom, self-taught with zero industry knowledge or contacts and didn't even start writing until I was 30. My road was not easy but I stayed on it. I hope you do too.



    W

    One of the hardest things to deal with as a writer is having patience. Especially when I want to get where I want to be in a hurry and it feels like it's taking forever. I also have not been the greatest at handling disappointment. Outwardly, I project "can do" positive, but inwardly I am bummed when things don't go as planned. Especially when friends and family assume that once you hit at a certain percentage in some major contests, you are on your way and you kind of have to temper their expectations. That's why it's very comforting to hear your story, which is like Rocky for screenwriters. The only thing missing is you running up the steps in Philadelphia. I enjoyed reading about your story of perseverance in that article and was pleasantly surprised to see you on here two weeks later. Thanks for sharing.

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    I spend YEARS not placing or winning. I believed that if I worked hard enough, listened to feedback and continued to improve that I would either start seeing results or just die with a giant stack of screenplays. There's nothing else I'm really good at. I've written 22 features over the course of 18 years. I would have written 23 and tried again this year. I've also been involved with my local filmmaking community and have been writing shorts to get experience in production and what a script really is in the "real world." My last short won dozens of festival awards and was incredibly fun to write, make and take out into the world and continued to fuel my enthusiasm for the film business. There's no magic way around it. I've said it before though... I'm a middle-aged, stay at home mom, self-taught with zero industry knowledge or contacts and didn't even start writing until I was 30. My road was not easy but I stayed on it. I hope you do too.

    W
    i love that you're sharing this with us, because it's so damn hard. but knowing there's someone else who doesn't give up and has success energizes your spirit.

    thanks UpandComing and Satriales.

    Satriales-- that's how it was with my manager. i do wish i'd kept track of who he sent it to. i am hopeful that i'll find another manager.

    as a reminder to writers who sometimes fall into a temporary pit of despair, your time will come. it might not happen the way you hope or as fast as you like, but it will happen. know that in your heart.

    and once you get representation there's a whole set of new rejections you have to deal with, like i still keep the email about how Sony TV exec had his entire staff read my feature spec overnight and then met about it the next day. it was close. they considered it. they did eventually pass as there were some similar-ish TV shows that were canceled the same week. it reminds me i'm good enough.

    then when you receive your first option agreement and you just can't accept it. (i had two on two different specs) knowing you had two additional people who felt strongly about your work, but whose demands simply aren't acceptable even after going back and forth for an entire month.

    those ones hurt, too.

    and then, sometimes, you have to start all over from scratch. you have to remind yourself at those times that you are good enough, and you can't give up, just like wenonah never gave up and look-- they are now a shooting star.

    i love this site. this community.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by Friday View Post
    Just out of curiosity, what do you think were the actions you took that got you over the hump. I started entering contests a year and half ago. I placed highly in the first major contest I entered, but now find myself not quite getting over the hump. Doing well enough in contests to soothe my bruised ego, but not really winning anything. I only stick to the major contests.

    I spend YEARS not placing or winning. I believed that if I worked hard enough, listened to feedback and continued to improve that I would either start seeing results or just die with a giant stack of screenplays. There's nothing else I'm really good at. I've written 22 features over the course of 18 years. I would have written 23 and tried again this year. I've also been involved with my local filmmaking community and have been writing shorts to get experience in production and what a script really is in the "real world." My last short won dozens of festival awards and was incredibly fun to write, make and take out into the world and continued to fuel my enthusiasm for the film business. There's no magic way around it. I've said it before though... I'm a middle-aged, stay at home mom, self-taught with zero industry knowledge or contacts and didn't even start writing until I was 30. My road was not easy but I stayed on it. I hope you do too.



    W

    Leave a comment:


  • Satriales
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Lisa, very sorry for your experience. That's lousy.

    As for rep communications, I'm rarely cc'd on anything. Maybe two or three times has it happened. Other times I'll be forwarded responses from someone. Usually it's an aside to a phone call or a text conversation saying "out to Producer X- or a note that someone reached out from a company wanting to read. I have a pretty high level of trust with my manager and we're friends so I don't feel the need to be looped in on everything. A large percentage of folks his talking to I've met at this point and we have had our own separate side conversations. I usually keep him involved in those exchanges if it's anything substantive relating to actual work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    Hey guys! First of all, I'm beyond happy to be a spectator on this one. I hope one (or more) of you becomes a fellow this year - I'm rooting for you! My script that won last year (and also won Austin) was indeed what I would consider more niche or independent due to the setting, characters and subject matter. However, I've heard from so many people that it's a thriller at heart and a "page turner" and has served as an incredible calling card/writing sample for me. Winning the Nicholl has changed my life. I am currently repped by UTA who read my Nicholl script and asked what else I had. Because I've been writing for so long and have a big body of work in multiple genres I was able to send them a high concept comedy (which won PAGE gold in 2011) and those two scripts landed me my feature agents. I also had a tv pilot that was a finalist in the sundance episodic labs and that added a tv agent in the same company.

    During the Nicholl week (and the week following) last November I went on 30 general meetings with all the major studios and many amazing production companies with these three writing samples. I subsequently went on another 15 generals in Juanuary. Needless to say I went from never meeting a producer to having 45 meetings under my belt. It's been an incredibly surreal, exciting, exhausting and sometimes nerve-wracking experience. (I'm a full blown introvert)

    In the last 3 months, I've pitched on an open assignment to a major studio (my first pitch.) I've read half a dozen books sent to me to consider for adaptation. I've had multiple producers reach out to me to work on their tv projects and (knock on wood) I think I'm optioning one of my specs next week. I love my agents, they work extremely hard for me and I feel they have my back. I don't have a manager. I am not yet in the union.

    It's HAPPENING!!!

    As far as the Nicholl goes, I've been applying since 2003 and rarely with the same script twice. I've submitted dramas, comedies, horror, family adventure, etc. The main thing I've noticed is that I slowly started going from no placement to QF to SF to a win over the course of the years, no matter what genre. I became a better writer, chose better scripts and maybe just got a little luckier this time around.

    I'm very proud of myself and my accomplishments. My family is proud of me. I'm excited to transition to a working professional writer and I'm ready to do the work. I struggle with anxiety and self-doubt and the hustle is not easy for this old lady but I've worked hard to get here and I'm going to ride this opportunity out to the fullest.

    Good luck to all of you.

    Totally random story. A few weeks ago, I was having a rotten day, so I took off to see a movie. Waiting for the movie to start, I had read some article about a writer that won both the Nicholl and Austin. I found it made me feel better, lifting my spirits. Sometimes a feel good story works like "Chicken Soup for the soul." It's cool that you came on here to share some uplifting words. Just out of curiosity, what do you think were the actions you took that got you over the hump. I started entering contests a year and half ago. I placed highly in the first major contest I entered, but now find myself not quite getting over the hump. Doing well enough in contests to soothe my bruised ego, but not really winning anything. I only stick to the major contests.

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    this is just my opinion, but i do think Nicholl prefers a 'type' of story. And when i say this, i in no way mean that these are not quality stories worth winning or placing.

    independent leanings
    lower budget
    smaller cast
    non-specific location (ie small town vs multiple, big city)
    character driven focus vs plot driven
    internal struggle (journey) stronger than external (journey)
    primary genres drama and comedy

    here is a link to their judging criteria. https://www.oscars.org/nicholl/about

    clearly, i do not have empirical knowledge. it's just what i believe after reviewing loglines.

    there's no way to know what the overall submissions are, but i think anyone might reasonably assume that since it is the most prestigious amateur competition that everyone, regardless of genre, would enter.

    then again, i didn't, so maybe there are others that feel as i do. don't know.

    so, imo, if you write or have written a high concept, highly commercial, epic sci-fi/fantasy, or high budget plot driven script (yes, i know plot is driven by character), maybe this is not the competition for you.

    and, just because you don't win or place in the Nicholl does not mean you aren't an excellent writer or your story isn't amazing. it's still very subjective.

    what i think is interesting is writers submit the same script year after year. i understand if it's gone through an overhaul rewrite, maybe, but i read one person who said they sent in the same script twice and both times they were a semifinalist. i mean, if you're a semifinalist i'm pretty sure you get to keep the title forever, right? it's just a curious thing to me.

    i'll bet there've been writers who placed then submitted the next year and didn't place at all, right? like, count your blessings-- i mean, it's that subjective.

    or even a writer who entered one year didn't place and the next year did, right?

    maybe i'd feel different if i was a semi and really wanted to get the win. but it's like, okay, you tried twice, move on and accept your place. they've already told you you were good.

    maybe it's the fellowship they're after?

    Haha, I guess I am to blame for this discussion. I was kind of surprised to see that an off the cuff comment by me has generated a 3 page discussion. But, I love the interesting discussion.


    You articulated it better than me. I assumed it was general knowledge. I've heard managers on podcasts make similar comments. And I've had discussions with industry readers that had set me straight to be cognizant of the type of material to submit for the different contests - i.e. if I ever decide to enter Nicholl to have one that Nicholl would be more receptive to. I was steered to look at the loglines of the past finalists to get a sense and I realized that I didn't have a project that fit that mold yet. One of these days I'll look into it, but so far I can't come up with an idea in that range. As for contestants that submit scripts that placed highly in contests year after year, I thought writers who place highly one year aren't eligible to submit that script the following year? I had checked with a contest organizer when she gave me the good news about the question of if a contestant placed highly, but wasn't the overall winner....and she said no, they weren't eligible. Anyways, it's kind of nice that done dealers are so hard core about the craft. It seems like almost everyone on this board has done well in contests and are seriously dedicated to the craft.

    Leave a comment:


  • UpandComing
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Thanks for sharing your thought process. It's good you know there's another manager out there who's passionate about your work, and thus should be receptive to your new projects.

    Sorry to hear about that icky set situation. I know actors/actresses are used to it, but you'd think as screenwriters we'd be somewhat protected from that kind of sleaze in this town. Guess not.

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by UpandComing View Post
    Hey finalact4, thanks for providing this insight. It seems that you thought both managers were strong contenders. Just curious about what made you ultimately choose one over the other. Were there more than a few factors? And did you not get a sense of his producorial leanings when considering him? I get the sense that writers should ask this question upfront so they can know what to expect.
    if i'm honest, and i like to be, my manager was very excited about my spec. i mean, i couldn't believe how excited he was about it and i just had a really great feeling. i had just started sending it out and they both requested it within a day of receiving my query ad read it immediately.

    i'd had about 14 read requests from cold queries and black list 8s and 9s really helped with that. i even emailed every manager that requested it to read and told them when it was no longer available out of respect for their time. they were gracious and every single one congratulated me.

    the second rep, who i will be reaching out to when my new spec it ready, was just as excited. said he was "so bummed," and when i told him that i signed with someone, he immediately called him, on his own, i didn't give him his number or contact info, just to tell my manager how lucky he thought my manager was.

    and i'm not sure, but maybe part of the problem with the option, that i would not have been privy to, was the fact that my manager was attaching as a producer. maybe the other party wasn't so keen on that, i'll never know. i wouldn't have been a party to those conversations. who knows.

    i was just so happy to have a manager, i just let things slide after the first two specs. and in my opinion he is excellent at guiding you to make the script shine. you know, things that are in your head and no quite on the page.

    i could tell he wasn't into 'managing' and really only wanted to develop things he was interested in.

    i was pretty disappointed that one day i had a manager and like that, i didn't. no meetings. sent me some copies of the emails he sent out, but didn't cc me on anything.

    i'd like to know from other writers how they keep track of who's been sent your spec? does your manager just tell you "it went out to such and such and this was their response" or are you, as the writer, cc'd on everything? it would seem the party receiving the information might be more forthright with their opinion of the script if the writer was not on the cc.

    i'm hesitant to tell this story, but i think women need to hear it--

    i will say, one thing that happened that i thought was the most disappointing. i was invited to a location set where they were filming a pilot and it was amazing. i really learned a lot just watching the actors, director and crew.

    i met one of the actors and we chatted about passion for our craft and how he got started and how i got started. a real nice, professional feeling conversation.

    it took me like 3 1/2 hours to get there, including a ferry, and after i left to go home, i got a call from my manager saying that the actor was really impressed with me and wanted to know if i would come back for to have dinner with him.

    i mean, he was trying to play it off like it was all innocent and funny, but he kept coming back around to getting me to travel back. this actor was in a very famous movie in the 80s, so he's like my father's age. i'd just spent almost 7 hours traveling. ugh.

    i finally had to say, "tell him i've got a boyfriend." he was pushing pretty hard and i felt very uncomfortable and when he pushed one last time, "so it's a no?" i said firmly, "yes, it's a no." i don't think i've ever been so insulted. i've dealt with that kind of **** my whole life. i learned a very good lesson, i think. i'll be more up front this next time with my expectations. i know he just wanted to make the actor happy, but damn, i'm not a ****ing booty call.

    anyway, i'm hoping this is a good year. right now i'm fortunate enough to be writing full time. not sure how long it will last, but busting my ass everyday to get as much writing in as possible.

    good luck to all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Thanks everyone. I honestly would not be here without having my DDers support throughout the years. As a new (not in LA) writer looking for a community to learn from and ask questions and commiserate with year after year of not quite breaking in, it was/is my safe place. I'm all about paying it forward and being available and keeping you all close and informed. In the end we're all just hunkered over the keyboard spilling our guts and trying to get paid. If i ever get to a place where i can truly help out and make a difference I will try my best. Carry on.

    W

    Leave a comment:


  • UpandComing
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    I finished up Horsehead Girls the first week of March a year ago for a local Minnesota screenwriters fellowship (McKnight foundation) which I also won. I submitted the finished script to the Nicholl the same week and Austin shortly thereafter so the script was brand spanking new and nobody had laid eyes on it prior to my submissions. I also submitted to PAGE but only made QF with it so that's a testament to the subjectivity and proof that not all competitions are looking for the same thing.

    Thanks! To me the fact that the script also placed in PAGE and won the McKnight Fellowship is just more evidence that a lot of people liked it. Wishing you continued success.

    Leave a comment:


  • DaltWisney
    replied
    Re: Nicholl 2019

    Originally posted by wenonah View Post
    Hey guys! First of all, I'm beyond happy to be a spectator on this one. I hope one (or more) of you becomes a fellow this year - I'm rooting for you! My script that won last year (and also won Austin) was indeed what I would consider more niche or independent due to the setting, characters and subject matter. However, I've heard from so many people that it's a thriller at heart and a "page turner" and has served as an incredible calling card/writing sample for me. Winning the Nicholl has changed my life. I am currently repped by UTA who read my Nicholl script and asked what else I had. Because I've been writing for so long and have a big body of work in multiple genres I was able to send them a high concept comedy (which won PAGE gold in 2011) and those two scripts landed me my feature agents. I also had a tv pilot that was a finalist in the sundance episodic labs and that added a tv agent in the same company.

    During the Nicholl week (and the week following) last November I went on 30 general meetings with all the major studios and many amazing production companies with these three writing samples. I subsequently went on another 15 generals in Juanuary. Needless to say I went from never meeting a producer to having 45 meetings under my belt. It's been an incredibly surreal, exciting, exhausting and sometimes nerve-wracking experience. (I'm a full blown introvert)

    In the last 3 months, I've pitched on an open assignment to a major studio (my first pitch.) I've read half a dozen books sent to me to consider for adaptation. I've had multiple producers reach out to me to work on their tv projects and (knock on wood) I think I'm optioning one of my specs next week. I love my agents, they work extremely hard for me and I feel they have my back. I don't have a manager. I am not yet in the union.

    It's HAPPENING!!!

    As far as the Nicholl goes, I've been applying since 2003 and rarely with the same script twice. I've submitted dramas, comedies, horror, family adventure, etc. The main thing I've noticed is that I slowly started going from no placement to QF to SF to a win over the course of the years, no matter what genre. I became a better writer, chose better scripts and maybe just got a little luckier this time around.

    I'm very proud of myself and my accomplishments. My family is proud of me. I'm excited to transition to a working professional writer and I'm ready to do the work. I struggle with anxiety and self-doubt and the hustle is not easy for this old lady but I've worked hard to get here and I'm going to ride this opportunity out to the fullest.

    Good luck to all of you.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X