Franklin Leonard

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  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by GucciGhostXXX View Post
    Then you just politely decline. I've been in both situations.

    With the rep you are actually the one who has to say to them "After much consideration, and while I respect your game plan, I've decided to go with ____. Thank you for your consideration."

    With saying "No" to a producer, hopefully you're repped by that time and don't have to do it yourself. Rep gets on the phone, something to the effect of "My client really loved your take, but has decided to go with ____. They really enjoyed meeting with you and hope to do business on a future project."

    Something like that...

    With a particular show of mine that was the truth. I DID like all their takes on how to do it. I just liked one the best. Agent handled the passes. I just said which one seemed like the best fit.

    That's good advice. Yeah, there's always the concern of burning an unnecessary bridge...odds are you probably will see that person down the road. Maybe, you don't do business, but you still want to be on good terms.

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  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by GucciGhostXXX View Post
    TRUST.

    That's it... That's what "good in a room" boils down to. Not style.

    You can be hella awkward (Coen Brothers, Charlie Kaufman etc.) but instill confidence in others that you know what the fukk you're talking about and know exactly how to accomplish it. That's all they want "Will this writer save us? Because we have no fukkin clue how to do this."

    Look at Stephen Hawking, do you TRUST he was smarter than you? I bet you do. If I have string theory questions, he'd have been the first person I asked.

    Maybe a better example: Craig Mazin vs John August. Their styles are completely different. Which one of them would you trust to deliver on a script? Yup, both of them. Why? Because they both know what they're talking about and commend that authority over what they're pitching. The specific style doesn't matter.

    That's the best explanation I've heard. Thanks. Yeah, I'd pretty much trust Charlie Kaufman to just go and write his stuff, after reading his scripts like Adaptation and Being John Malkovich. And I'd definitely trust James Cameron on whatever he wants to do. I guess when writers think about being good in a room, they are thinking they need to be this larger in life character that's electrifying. What I saw with the professional writers were that they seemed to be normal people (a little on the awkward side), but did seem to know what they were talking about--like they had a way with words.

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Friday View Post
    LOL. You can die of encouragement in this town. I enjoyed reading your take. Not saying, writers will have this champagne problem, but what if they are in a situation where they want to sign with a rep, but not the others or do not want to take a deal with such and such producer because other writers have said they didn't enjoy their experience with that producer?
    Then you just politely decline. I've been in both situations.

    With the rep you are actually the one who has to say to them "After much consideration, and while I respect your game plan, I've decided to go with ____. Thank you for your consideration."

    With saying "No" to a producer, hopefully you're repped by that time and don't have to do it yourself. Rep gets on the phone, something to the effect of "My client really loved your take, but has decided to go with ____. They really enjoyed meeting with you and hope to do business on a future project."

    Something like that...

    With a particular show of mine that was the truth. I DID like all their takes on how to do it. I just liked one the best. Agent handled the passes. I just said which one seemed like the best fit.

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Friday View Post
    I've watched highly successful writers speak at panels and I have to be honest, they seemed kind of awkward - not really the schmoozers/light up the room types. It confuses me as to what being good in a room means.
    TRUST.

    That's it... That's what "good in a room" boils down to. Not style.

    You can be hella awkward (Coen Brothers, Charlie Kaufman etc.) but instill confidence in others that you know what the fukk you're talking about and know exactly how to accomplish it. That's all they want "Will this writer save us? Because we have no fukkin clue how to do this."

    Look at Stephen Hawking, do you TRUST he was smarter than you? I bet you do. If I have string theory questions, he'd have been the first person I asked.

    Maybe a better example: Craig Mazin vs John August. Their styles are completely different. Which one of them would you trust to deliver on a script? Yup, both of them. Why? Because they both know what they're talking about and commend that authority over what they're pitching. The specific style doesn't matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by GucciGhostXXX View Post
    Easy answer...

    YOU never say "No!" You ALWAYS (and I hate the word always 'cause it NEVER applies... except for here) say "Sounds great! Let me consider it and get back to you." Then you tell you rep "Super not interested." Then your rep gets to be the bad guy and let them down strategically. "They really loved the project, but aren't available." Or whatever... (high class problem)

    Never say "No" yourself IMO. Not your job.

    Also, it's aways "Yes, if..."

    Can you write a treatment?

    "Yes, if..."

    Can you write a draft?

    "Yes, if..."

    Can you come up with a take?

    "Yes, if..."

    Feel me?

    Take "No" out of your vocabulary.

    LOL. You can die of encouragement in this town. I enjoyed reading your take. Not saying, writers will have this champagne problem, but what if they are in a situation where they want to sign with a rep, but not the others or do not want to take a deal with such and such producer because other writers have said they didn't enjoy their experience with that producer?

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Friday View Post
    Question: How do you say no in the business? As writers go up the ranks and deal with managers, agents, producers, actors, directors, etc., how do they say no without burning bridges? I am sure they will be put in a position where in order to say yes to someone, they have to say no to others.
    Easy answer...

    YOU never say "No!" You ALWAYS (and I hate the word always 'cause it NEVER applies... except for here) say "Sounds great! Let me consider it and get back to you." Then you tell you rep "Super not interested." Then your rep gets to be the bad guy and let them down strategically. "They really loved the project, but aren't available." Or whatever... (high class problem)

    Never say "No" yourself IMO. Not your job.

    Also, it's aways "Yes, if..."

    Can you write a treatment?

    "Yes, if..."

    Can you write a draft?

    "Yes, if..."

    Can you come up with a take?

    "Yes, if..."

    Feel me?

    Take "No" out of your vocabulary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by GucciGhostXXX View Post
    True.

    It's hella hard to walk into these shops and feel confident. HBO is one of the most intimidating shops IMO. Their 50 foot HBO sign and they have you sit in the lobby directly under a 1,000,000 inch TV playing the absolute fukking best scenes of GoT right before you pitch. Awesome! THANKS! Just what I needed to see right this before I pitch. Nope, I don't feel insecure AT ALL! (My inner monolog "Fukk am I doing here pretending to know what the fukk I'm talking about??? I SHOULD RUN! NOW'S MY CHANCE. NO ONE'S LOOKING. BRO RUUUUN!")

    You just gotta suck it up and act. And realize that these creators have been in your exact shoes.

    Here's what I say to myself before every meeting: "If it's not me, it'll be someone else, so why not me?" I believe (hope I do) that I go into meetings strong. You hafta try to mentally get there or you'll freak them out, because they're scared too. They don't want to lose their job over your "dumb idea." Confidence is contagious.

    I've watched highly successful writers speak at panels and I have to be honest, they seemed kind of awkward - not really the schmoozers/light up the room types. It confuses me as to what being good in a room means.

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Friday View Post
    Building rapport is easier said than done. Many people have it in head their head all the right things to do, but when they are there, it's a different ball game. They might not even know the first thing of how to do that in the context of meetings and industry events.
    True.

    It's hella hard to walk into these shops and feel confident. HBO is one of the most intimidating shops IMO. Their 50 foot HBO sign and they have you sit in the lobby directly under a 1,000,000 inch TV playing the absolute fukking best scenes of GoT right before you pitch. Awesome! THANKS! Just what I needed to see right this before I pitch. Nope, I don't feel insecure AT ALL! (My inner monolog "Fukk am I doing here pretending to know what the fukk I'm talking about??? I SHOULD RUN! NOW'S MY CHANCE. NO ONE'S LOOKING. BRO RUUUUN!")

    You just gotta suck it up and act. And realize that these creators have been in your exact shoes.

    Here's what I say to myself before every meeting: "If it's not me, it'll be someone else, so why not me?" I believe (hope I do) that I go into meetings strong. You hafta try to mentally get there or you'll freak them out, because they're scared too. They don't want to lose their job over your "dumb idea." Confidence is contagious.

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    My writing partner and I gave great meeting. They had fun. One guy said that was a top 3 meeting for him. And we are still friends. But it hasn't lead to any money or any sale, so might as well have stayed home!

    So yeah, I think you call meetings because what else do they have to do all day and it's all a hassle for the person having to swing by their office.

    And i'm not an LA guy but maybe if you're going to be a town that wants a meeting for everything, maybe be based in NYC a town that you can get from A to Z in under 3 days.
    Ha! Yup. Try to do 5 meetings in one day in LA... fukkin dare you. you! WILL! die! LOL

    I've never had a general turn into anything.

    ...Take that back. ONCE!

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Question: How do you say no in the business? As writers go up the ranks and deal with managers, agents, producers, actors, directors, etc., how do they say no without burning bridges? I am sure they will be put in a position where in order to say yes to someone, they have to say no to others.

    Leave a comment:


  • Friday
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Building rapport is easier said than done. Many people have it in head their head all the right things to do, but when they are there, it's a different ball game. They might not even know the first thing of how to do that in the context of meetings and industry events.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bono
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    My writing partner and I gave great meeting. They had fun. One guy said that was a top 3 meeting for him. And we are still friends. But it hasn't lead to any money or any sale, so might as well have stayed home!

    So yeah, I think you call meetings because what else do they have to do all day and it's all a hassle for the person having to swing by their office.

    And i'm not an LA guy but maybe if you're going to be a town that wants a meeting for everything, maybe be based in NYC a town that you can get from A to Z in under 3 days.

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    yup, 2018, my bad.

    i think you're right about gauging a meeting on how off topic it can get. in my previous work, we'd get into meetings where they go on and on for hours on end. and by the end if they're talking personal stuff you know you're good. the meeting was good. i'm not talking about deep dark secrets, i'm talking about when people become "inclusive" in a conversation. that's how you know you're doing well. i think.

    building relationships and having a rapport is so important, you don't have to be in Hollywood to know that, because when you have to spend a lot of time with someone, it's a hell of a lot easier when you really like them and respect them.

    i will say, that i was a little surprised that the review process at The Black List can take "up to three weeks." what??
    No worries. Just wanted to be sure I wasn't looking at the wrong interview.

    Ha! I get deep dark secrets outta people. But, agreed, inclusive is everything. If I'm suddenly not talking and they're pitching me ways it could be better. FANTASTIC! We've built rapport. Now we're in sync (Baby bye bye bye) and speaking a common language.

    Silence is rarely a good sign.

    Leave a comment:

  • finalact4
    Member

  • finalact4
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    yup, 2018, my bad.

    i think you're right about gauging a meeting on how off topic it can get. in my previous work, we'd get into meetings where they go on and on for hours on end. and by the end if they're talking personal stuff you know you're good. the meeting was good. i'm not talking about deep dark secrets, i'm talking about when people become "inclusive" in a conversation. that's how you know you're doing well. i think.

    building relationships and having a rapport is so important, you don't have to be in Hollywood to know that, because when you have to spend a lot of time with someone, it's a hell of a lot easier when you really like them and respect them.

    i will say, that i was a little surprised that the review process at The Black List can take "up to three weeks." what??

    Leave a comment:

  • GucciGhostXXX
    Member

  • GucciGhostXXX
    replied
    Re: Franklin Leonard

    Originally posted by Bono View Post
    Craig Mazin hates all contests. Scripts consultants. Final Draft software - which is fine really. I get it others are better customer service... anyway... 99.9% of that stuff. There was only 1 thing I recall him not making fun of on his podcast. And you can guess what service that is off this thread...

    I say that because sometimes we say things to help out our buddies... to be nice to people we see at kids birthday parties.

    So my point was, we you hear interviews with managers or agents or anyone be skeptical of all advice about the business given in a public way. Hell any interview from anyone. The truth is in the shadows. Ha ha ha ha ha.
    Absofukkinlutely! And I know exactly what your cryptic post means. Agreed. (I do find Craig hilarious tho) But, yeah, interesting he's never gone at ____'s business model. I know he could shred it. *sideways glare* C'mon, bruh...

    SHOWbusiness. Yup, it's fake AF.

    Which kinda folds back into my post about meetings and people confiding in you. I honestly don't know, am I just one of those people who people feel comfortable divulging sh!t to, sometimes my meetings feel more like a therapy session than a meeting, like they need to get sh!t off their chest and be REAL for a sec in this fake-azz biz, or do they do this with everyone? (My fiancee says, "Dude... you get people to reveal sh!t. Complete strangers open up to you.") I talk to everyone. So IDK?

    But, yeah, fascinating when you're doing a meeting and they're revealing sh!t where you're like "Wow... I would have assumed you were tight with _____." NOPE! "Yes, I made a movie with them, but they won't return my calls." For fukkin REAL, you? You're HUGE. "Oh and, btw, don't trust ___ over at ___, they screwed me by doing ___." Bruh, should you be telling me this?

    Yup, behind closed doors is something else entirely.

    Like I've said. The sh!t I've heard at say kid's birthday parties after they've had a glass or 3 of wine.

    Example. Studio head. Party: "I don't know why we're making this movie. I hate the script. But whatever..." (It flopped... he was right.)

    Leave a comment:

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