Phrases happening now

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  • #61
    Re: Phrases happening now

    That's so raven.
    The end is too damn nigh.

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    • #62
      Re: Phrases happening now

      I'm so guilty of using the word "like" (and "so"). "He was like, 'Okay, I'm in.'"

      I say "dude" nearly as much as Shawn Spencer and in exactly the same way. (Yes, I've gotten, "Did you just call me 'dude'?")

      I also sometimes drop the object of the preposition of sentences (I think I got this from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"). "Want to come with?"

      (I'm 28 and female, btw.)

      "We're all immigrants now, man."
      - Zia (Patrick Fugit), "Wristcutters: A Love Story"

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      • #63
        Re: Phrases happening now

        That's hella... whatever.
        "Forget it, Jake. It's Hollywood."

        My YouTube channel.

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        • #64
          Re: Phrases happening now

          I've noticed that a lot of twentysomethings start using the current supposedly hip phrases ironically -- much like we nerdy white folk will sometimes use outmoded urban slang to be funny, as has already been mentioned here. So stuff they thought was maybe kind of silly, or they thought they couldn't really pull it off, they'll use facetiously. And then it creeps into their vernarcular and they start using it unironically. I did this with "dude." I was always tacking it on to be silly, and now I actually say it without thinking. A big one I see gaining traction in this way is "for reals." Also the use of "mad" as a synonym for "very." As in, "That sh!t is mad crazy, yo." As someone has mentioned, text-speak is big, but more in blogging and message boards and email than in speech. Check out some of the boards over on IMDb and you'll see how few words get written out as they are actually spelled. It's kind of freaky.

          Some stuff that's a few years old but still hanging around: Calling someone a "hater" or "putting [name here] on blast." "Fugly" remains a classic insult. And speaking of insults, "whore" is way more popular than it used to be. (And is considered pretty low-grade profanity.) It also seems to be more popular than ever to call somebody fat as an all purpose go-to insult.

          Also, stuff like skater lingo has made its way into the general vocab, thanks to shows like "Life with Ryan." So "sick" as a good thing is popular now. (As in, "Dude, that was a sick grab.)

          My friends and I use "rock star" all the time. "I just got rock star parking." Or if somebody does something nice for you, "You're such a rock star." Then again, my friends and I are not what you'd call cutting edge, so I don't know if you can go by us. We're also big on adapting "MILF" to suit our needs by swapping the first consonant out. So baseball player Jeff Francour, whose team nickname is "Frenchy," is known in the gang as my FILF, because I already have a good friend whose nickname is Frenchy, and I would most certainly not LF him. (He is very gay and would not like me to LF him, so he's not offended.)

          Yeah, we're dorks. Definitely don't go by us.

          Oh, the other thing that's huge is to say of someone, "I love her to death." That's not remotely new, but it is hugely popular right now, especially as a means of saying you're fond of someone without actually saying you love them love them. (I know, it makes no sense, but apparently if you put "to death" after "love," then it doesn't count as an actual admission of actual love. It is very big usage among "fvckbuddies" and "friends with benefits.")

          And to agree with twk, I must agree that "clusterfvck" is on the uprise. It's certainly not new, true, but it is having a renaissance at the moment. Which is awesome, imo, 'cause I love that word. (Oh, and "awesome" is back, too, only now it's usually just "awes.")

          Sorry if this rambles. I grabbed me a Vicodin for some back pain tonight, and now I'm all loosy goosey and averse to pithiness. Hah!
          The difference between the almost right word & the right word is really a large matter -- it's the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning. - Mark Twain

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          • #65
            Re: Phrases happening now

            Originally posted by jillybob View Post
            Also, stuff like skater lingo has made its way into the general vocab, thanks to shows like "Life with Ryan." So "sick" as a good thing is popular now. (As in, "Dude, that was a sick grab.)
            I just used that last night. This young writer came up with this brilliant script concept, fully outlined, in just a few hours and I said, "You did that in four hours? That's sick!" Clearly meant in a good way. (I've never watched "Life of Ryan" though.) It was out of my mouth before I even thought about it. Not intentionally trying to sound hip or anything, because when you try, it's obvious that you're trying.

            "We're all immigrants now, man."
            - Zia (Patrick Fugit), "Wristcutters: A Love Story"

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