Mental institutions

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  • Mental institutions

    .
    Last edited by Anitapooh; 07-31-2011, 11:23 AM.


  • #2
    Re: Mental institutions

    You make it however you want, just make it believable.

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    • #3
      Re: Mental institutions

      The louder you get, the more chlorpromazine/thorazine they give you. Then you can't form words, only bubbles.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Re: Mental institutions

        Originally posted by Adam Isaac View Post
        The louder you get, the more chlorpromazine/thorazine they give you. Then you can't form words, only bubbles.
        Adam Isaac, reporting live from cell 666 at Arkham Asylum.

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        • #5
          Re: Mental institutions

          I'm not even in my cell...hahahahahaha!
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Re: Mental institutions

            Originally posted by Adam Isaac View Post
            I'm not even in my cell...hahahahahaha!
            Quick, call for Batman!

            Quick story: One Christmas, when I was younger, I got a Batman alarm clock. The damn thing, every morning, would go off at 7am with the message:

            GOTHAM CITY IS IN TROUBLE! CALL FOR BATMAN!
            GOTHAM CITY IS IN TROUBLE! CALL FOR BATMAN!

            Seriously, the Batman word was like 100 decibels higher than everything else.

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            • #7
              Psychiatric Hospitals

              Originally posted by Anitapooh View Post
              I'm writing on a script where I have a man trapped in a mental institution (he doesn't know/remember why he's there).

              And then I wanted to add a woman (patient) there who becomes friends with him..

              But now I am wondering if men and women are in real life put in the same areas at all, in those mental institutions.

              Anybody know?
              Depending upon the time period and the types of illnesses involved, wards can be either segregated by sex, or mixed. For example, into the 1960s, Kingston Psychiatric Hospital had segregated wards, with separate entrances, but many facilities, such as the chapel, dining rooms, and recreation areas were for mixed use, (easy places to socialize, under supervision). Today, with the exception of some restricted wards, (ie. dementia, sex offenders, criminals, and screenwriters), most wards are mixed, ("co-ed," if you like), including "admissions" and "forensics."

              The old insane asylum in Kingston, Rockwood, was undoubtedly segregated; and, when not restricted to their cells, the wards were really only used for dining, washing, and sitting about, (not much need for "fresh air" nor "recreation," back then). Cells are nice and quiet, (thick stone walls), if a bit cramped. Two of the characters in my current film project are sent to Rockwood, and the building was used as the set for the prison in VENDETTA.
              JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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              • #8
                Re: Mental institutions

                I think Fortean answered the question very well. I have not had much experience with asylums. They are not used as much as they once were. Psych wards have largely disappeared, too. Most general hospitals had a psych ward in former years. Now they don't, because there is no money in it. In the U.S., medicine is run by large, greedy hospital corporations and the even larger and greedier insurance industry. Everything is about money, and of course the two competitors have differing interests.
                The louder you get, the more chlorpromazine/thorazine they give you.
                It is curious that laymen always know this drug, which was already an old drug on its way out when I was in medical school twenty-five years ago. It is still used for psychosis, as it was when I was in school, but it was already being supplanted by newer drugs even then, and in more recent years we have seen the introduction of the atypical antipsychotics, which have a somewhat better side-effect profile. Probably the drug you want to mention, these days, in place of Thorazine is Seroquel.

                "The fact that you have seen professionals write poorly is no reason for you to imitate them." - ComicBent.

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                • #9
                  Re: Mental institutions

                  check out Stephen Fry's depiction of a modern Scandinavian mental institution on his novel "The Star's Tennis Balls"
                  "You become what you think about all day long" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                  • #10
                    Re: Mental institutions

                    Originally posted by doubler83 View Post
                    Quick story: One Christmas, when I was younger, I got a Batman alarm clock. The damn thing, every morning, would go off at 7am with the message:

                    GOTHAM CITY IS IN TROUBLE! CALL FOR BATMAN!
                    GOTHAM CITY IS IN TROUBLE! CALL FOR BATMAN!

                    Seriously, the Batman word was like 100 decibels higher than everything else.
                    I want one of those!

                    The neighbors would love it. But serve 'em right, they scream at each other all the time, on and off from 8 AM to 11 PM some days.
                    "Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.-
                    ― Ray Bradbury

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                    • #11
                      Re: Mental institutions

                      Originally posted by ComicBent View Post
                      I think Fortean answered the question very well. I have not had much experience with asylums. They are not used as much as they once were. Psych wards have largely disappeared, too. Most general hospitals had a psych ward in former years. Now they don't, because there is no money in it. In the U.S., medicine is run by large, greedy hospital corporations and the even larger and greedier insurance industry. Everything is about money, and of course the two competitors have differing interests.
                      It is curious that laymen always know this drug, which was already an old drug on its way out when I was in medical school twenty-five years ago. It is still used for psychosis, as it was when I was in school, but it was already being supplanted by newer drugs even then, and in more recent years we have seen the introduction of the atypical antipsychotics, which have a somewhat better side-effect profile. Probably the drug you want to mention, these days, in place of Thorazine is Seroquel.

                      Yeah, olanzapine and quetiepine(may have mis-spelled these) are the more common treatment these days. Amisulpride is much cleaner as well. Thorazine antagonizes too many nueral receptors to be an effecient treatment...I just mentioned it out of brief nostalgia for the ways of the old school asylums. The science of the atypicals is much more more precise.

                      Isn't it still used as an inhibitor in severe dopamine reuptake situations like amphetamine overdose...I could be mistaken?
                      sigpic

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