American vocab

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  • American vocab

    Do you guy say "breather," as in to catch your breath or relax for a minute or two? took a breather after skiing for two hours.

  • #2
    Re: American vocab

    In Canada, yes, it is quite common. I would assume it is in America as well.

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    • #3
      Re: American vocab

      Common? I dunno.

      But certainly it wouldn't stand out as being wrong or un-American in any way.

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      • #4
        Re: American vocab

        Yes, also in the U.S.A.

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        • #5
          American Idiom

          Originally posted by JibJib View Post
          Do you guy say "breather," as in to catch your breath or relax for a minute or two? took a breather after skiing for two hours.
          "Breather" may be more common for an older person, but I'd think that more young people, in Canada and in the States, would take a short "break".
          JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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          • #6
            Re: American vocab

            Yes, it's a common term in the U.S.

            After jumping up and down over and over again,

            The little emoticon needed to stop for a breather,

            because he smokes too much.

            "The Hollywood film business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." Hunter S Thompson

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            • #7
              Re: American vocab

              matters what part of america, for example in the south we say soda and in the north they say pop. WTF kind of word is "pop"
              but yes, yes it is

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              • #8
                Re: American vocab

                Originally posted by JibJib View Post
                Do you guy say "breather," as in to catch your breath or relax for a minute or two? took a breather after skiing for two hours.
                Actually, no...not in the context you are using it.
                The best way out is always through. - Robert Frost

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                • #9
                  Re: American vocab

                  If someone said,

                  "I took a breather after jogging this morning."

                  Most people would look at you weird because they wouldn't know that you mean relax.

                  It would sound more like a apparatus or slang for some drug/pill/drink.
                  The best way out is always through. - Robert Frost

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                  • #10
                    Re: American vocab

                    It's funny you actually said the more common way to make that statement in your question. People would most likely say "let me get a sec to catch my breath."

                    "Take five" is another common expression to mean a break.

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                    • #11
                      Re: American vocab

                      Catch your breath or "rest" for a minute or two, is what I think he meant.

                      AFTER jogging, you wouldn't need a breather because you'd be done and could breathe all you want.
                      "The Hollywood film business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." Hunter S Thompson

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                      • #12
                        Re: American vocab

                        Originally posted by TBEagle View Post
                        matters what part of america, for example in the south we say soda and in the north they say pop. WTF kind of word is "pop"
                        but yes, yes it is
                        I think it must be Canadian/British influence because it's only the lingo in states close to the border.

                        I guess once upon a time back when everyone still called it soda pop they decided that soda pop was too long and so they had a conference to decide the new name. Half of them decided on Soda and the other half decided on Pop and that's why they call it Soda in America and Pop in Canada and Britain.

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                        • #13
                          Re: American vocab

                          Originally posted by Archduke View Post
                          I think it must be Canadian/British influence because it's only the lingo in states close to the border.

                          I guess once upon a time back when everyone still called it soda pop they decided that soda pop was too long and so they had a conference to decide the new name. Half of them decided on Soda and the other half decided on Pop and that's why they call it Soda in America and Pop in Canada and Britain.
                          I grew up in L.A. where everyone seemed to call it soda, but my mom was from Wisconsin, and she always called it pop. Sometimes she'd use the original term, soda pop. She gradually started using the term soda instead. I think there are still regions of the U.S. where some people call it pop or soda pop. I don't have to use any term very often because I don't drink it.
                          "The Hollywood film business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." Hunter S Thompson

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                          • #14
                            Re: American vocab

                            Originally posted by cshel View Post
                            I grew up in L.A. where everyone seemed to call it soda, but my mom was from Wisconsin, and she always called it pop. Sometimes she'd use the original term, soda pop. She gradually started using the term soda instead. I think there are still regions of the U.S. where some people call it pop or soda pop. I don't have to use any term very often because I don't drink it.
                            I grew up in LA to and I guess because all Television and Movies are made in LA or NY I never even realized so much of the country called it something besides soda.

                            Apparently some people have investigated this serious and puzzling subject in depth:

                            http://www.bookofjoe.com/images/2008/08/26/uoioiu.jpg

                            Southerners apparently call all Soda Coke. This map raises more questions than it answers.

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                            • #15
                              Re: American vocab

                              For what it's worth, it would make perfect sense here, and is a common expression.

                              (But not after jogging. It's not literally about breathing. Just an alternative to "break".)
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