Emergency physicians

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  • wey
    replied
    Re: emergency physicians

    Yes sir! Plenty here to work with now

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  • Bruce Rose
    replied
    Re: emergency physicians

    An ER doc never leaves the ER during the shift, unless they are covered during a break or there is a code up on the floor in the middle of the night or something. So no, the ER doc responsible for incoming traumas wouldn't be in any other part of the hospital, just the main ER.

    Depending what the trauma is, the ER would immediately call the trauma surgeon, neurosurgeon, ortho, vascular surgeon, cardiothoracic surgeon - whatever is needed. The surgical specialists don't camp out in the ER and are "on call" for emergencies. They likely would be in other areas of the hospital. The ER doc has to stabilize the patient until they come.

    Triage is a filter- no patients stay in triage. It's like a check-in. Care is not delivered there. The patient is triaged (assessed) by a nurse and sent to the proper place in the ER where they will wait until they get the care they need. If it is a serious illness, the patient will be up-triaged and sent back to be seen immediately.

    Now write a good script using all this

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  • wey
    replied
    Re: emergency physicians

    Thanks Bruce!! Great info. You must have some exciting stories!

    So just to clarify the doctor could be in any part of the ER department but be on call for the Trauma area of ER? Does a patient get moved from triage into another area if they have a broken or sprained ankle or other limb?
    Last edited by wey; 05-06-2014, 07:13 PM.

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  • Bruce Rose
    replied
    Re: emergency physicians

    First of all, you're not using terms correctly. Triage is an area of the ER where RNs make a judgement as to the severely and priority of the presenting illness. For example, the triage nurse is responsible for a chest pain patient being seen by a doctor before a patient with a runny nose. A doctor isn't stationed in triage.

    All ER doctors are trained to assess and stabilize anything that comes through the door, including trauma patients. These days, larger ERs are segmented and patients are shunted into specific areas such as peds, geriatrics, urgent care (for less serious problems). An ER doctor may do a shift in urgent care where they treat a bunch of colds and various sprains one day and the next day they may work in the main ER and have to deal with cardiac arrests, car accidents and gunshot wounds. BTW, I've worked in some of the worst inner city emergency rooms in The Bronx and North Philly and, fortunately, these dramatic situations don't occur nearly as often as depicted on TV shows. I always laugh when some TV depiction of an ER shows a trauma every 2 minutes to keep it exciting. A doctor isn't stationed in the trauma room because it is most likely something crazy like that won't come in during a shift. If it does, the doc will leave what they are doing in the main ER and take care of it.

    Lastly, generally ER doc shifts are 12 hours and weeks of days and nights will be alternated. There are more creative ways of doing it, though, and it is conceivable a doc could work a day shift that is less than 12 hours as you describe. Shifts are often staggered during the day to best cover the busiest hours.

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  • wey
    started a topic Emergency physicians

    Emergency physicians

    Does anyone know if an emergency physician working at a hospital can switch between the trauma room and the triage? also, is it possible for the physician to have a shift that goes from 8am to say 6pm or some kind of normal hours shift, every once in a while?
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