Stage 32, etc.

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Reps may not work weekends, but doesn't mean we can't. A director I sent a query sometime during the week, requested my spec an hour ago on Saturday so I sent it to him. Funny enough, I queried one of his reps on Friday. Probably a better chance him liking my work and maybe (small maybe) showing it to someone else. As Jeff said, you never know who can be the person who helps your career.

    And of course I can maybe help his career if I send him a good project! I shouldn't sell myself short. They are not all just doing us a favor. Us writers have value too! They just make us feel like we don't most of the time.

    Comment


    • #32
      Blacklist -- Non-guild members must host at least one screenplay or pilot ($30/script/month) in order for their membership to be active. We also encourage, but do not require, the purchase of at least one paid evaluation from our readers ($100/read for features and 1-hr pilots, $70/read for half-hour or less pilots). Only hosted scripts can receive evaluations.

      Guild members must list information for at least one script to have an active membership. They are not required to host a script or purchase an evaluation, but may do so at a discount (20% off monthly hosting and evaluations).


      My question is has anyone had success just hosting their script and NOT getting a review?

      Comment


      • #33
        I'm not plugging the Black List as some panacea. I'm saying that if you're determined to pay to get read - something I don't think people need to do - I think it has the best bang for the buck. JoeBanks's story is a perfect example of how a great script can generate sustained interest over there for not much cash.

        But that's the key. Most scripts aren't great. It's not a shot at any one writer - it's true of every writer. You need great execution - a lot of that comes from working your ass off, a lot of that comes from god given voice - and you need a compelling story so that someone will want to read it in the first place. If your concept is boring or confusing, it's not going to get attention, whether it's a free query letter or 10 bucks at virtual pitch fest or 35 bucks at Stage 32, or 100 bucks for coverage at Black List, etc, etc, etc...

        The only way to break in is by doing the work. Start writing the next script while you're querying the current one. Keep churning them out, keep sending them out.

        Bono's story is so illustrative - he's got 11 free read requests. He got them by doing the work for years, making contacts, and getting better at what kind of stories generate interest through query letters. How any people do you think he'd have to pitch his script to at a pay service to get 11 read requests?

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post

          Bono's story is so illustrative - he's got 11 free read requests. He got them by doing the work for years, making contacts, and getting better at what kind of stories generate interest through query letters. How any people do you think he'd have to pitch his script to at a pay service to get 11 read requests?
          Up to 16. Some I knew before. 9 no contact with before current spec. So if I went 10 bucks per query, I'm guessing I'd own about $5000 dollars so far.

          HOT QUERY TIP: Got same manager to read my TV Pilot after ignored my query for feature... so sometimes you got to be a little annoying and try querying the same person again with different work or different subject line... not every day, but feel it out. Those queries were about 14 days apart.


          Comment

          Working...
          X