The Pursuit of Happyness

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

    Originally posted by ihavebiglips View Post
    I've always been more impressed by the type of people that thought to swap the stickers around.
    I've found that the stickers don't stick as well after first being removed and can fall off, leaving blank mystery squares. A better way to cheat is to literally pull the contraction apart and put it back together so everything lines up right.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

      Doesn't it come that way in the box? Wouldn't the most Zen approach be ... to never play at all, then you've always already won?

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

        Originally posted by Pull Back Reveal View Post
        Doesn't it come that way in the box? Wouldn't the most Zen approach be ... to never play at all, then you've always already won?
        That is indeed my philosophy in life.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

          Originally posted by creativexec
          Will Smith is very charismatic, and I've always understood his appeal. But he cannot overcome the weak material here. Not a memorable performance, IMO.


          I went to a screening of it last night and, I agree that the material has some weaknesses. It drags a bit and there are no surprises. I'm not saying that I expected a twist in the thing, but the emotional moments in a movie like this should have the power to come at you sideways and catch you unawares. Some of the devices in the movie were really forced, I won't name then, but you'll know exactly what I'm talking about.

          Also, the Thandie Newton character was just incredibly shrill and uninteresting, which was a real problem.

          That being said, I still found myself really enjoying moments in the movie. And, yes, maybe I'm a sap, maybe it's because I have a five year old son, but I was moved. I was moved also to think a little bit about my life and how fortunate I am that I don't have to live from desperate moment to desperate moment.

          I think he might get a nomination, despite the weaknesses in the film and his performance. First, it's a pretty wide open field at this point, IMO. Second, it's an "uplifting" story about the American dream and takes stabs at a little bit of social commentary, even though it's commentary light. Finally, he's just so god damned likeable.

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

            Originally posted by creativexec
            This is TV movie fare. Overhyped, unimpressive and even a little tedious. It's doubtful they'll be any Oscar love for this.

            Have you seen it? I was hoping it was more complex than the commercials let on ...because sometimes commercials just pander to the masses and save the gold for the few who see beyond the surface of it. But no such gold upon viewing, huh?
            "The question isn't who will let me, but who is going to stop me?," -- Ayn Rand (via Howard Roark in The Fountainhead)

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

              I was at the screening, too, and I loved it. Very moved. Will Smith and his real life son are incredibly believable and natural. The boy says things that make you laugh without feeling he was reciting written material designed to be "cute." It all feels spontanious.

              Great rooting interest, and it didn't feel forced to me. I envy the economy and simplicity of the story -- how it's less about plot twists and more about moments where you worry and care about them as they have to stretch their meager resorces and keep up appearances in one catastrophe after anoter. Though they are small things, they matter a lot in the course of the story. I cared about them and what was going to happen every minute.

              It's like IN AMERICA, if you saw that, where you worry so much as the family spins a wheel at the carnival, because you know how much that money matters to them in their shaky economic condition.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

                Originally posted by Joaneasley View Post
                I was at the screening, too, and I loved it. Very moved. Will Smith and his real life son are incredibly believable and natural. The boy says things that make you laugh without feeling he was reciting written material designed to be "cute." It all feels spontanious.

                Great rooting interest, and it didn't feel forced to me. I envy the economy and simplicity of the story -- how it's less about plot twists and more about moments where you worry and care about them as they have to stretch their meager resorces and keep up appearances in one catastrophe after anoter. Though they are small things, they matter a lot in the course of the story. I cared about them and what was going to happen every minute.

                It's like IN AMERICA, if you saw that, where you worry so much as the family spins a wheel at the carnival, because you know how much that money matters to them in their shaky economic condition.
                I liked In America Quite a lot. One thing, though, was Steve Conrad one of the most painful public speakers you've ever heard? Man, the rhythm of his speech was like watching someone get teeth pulled.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

                  Originally posted by Joaneasley View Post
                  .

                  It's like IN AMERICA, if you saw that, where you worry so much as the family spins a wheel at the carnival, because you know how much that money matters to them in their shaky economic condition.
                  That's a pretty steep parallel. I loved In America. "Bye, Mateo!"

                  I plan to see Pursuit next weekend, I hope it lives up to your comparison.

                  I am noting, however, that creativexec said the writing is in a different realm ... sometimes that can make the most difference.
                  "The question isn't who will let me, but who is going to stop me?," -- Ayn Rand (via Howard Roark in The Fountainhead)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

                    Steve Conrad's public speaking was interesting in that he speaks more like a musician or an artist than a writer. Musicians and artists often don't tend to be too verbal, but they can create a mood with their art. You would expect writers to be more verbally precise because words are our tools. But Steve Conrad said he set out to write a movie that expresses a feeling he didn't have a word for: the feeling of urgency when you don't have enough money and you always have to hustle to survive. He said he had been in those shoes as a struggling screenwriter, so he knew the feeling. He wanted to make a movie to show what that feels like. He said people think poverty is slow, but it's not. It's fast.

                    And that's what he did -- he let us experience what that feels like. It's not a complicated or twisty plot with a lot of set-ups and payoffs. It's a simple throughline with a clear external goal and strong rooting interest. He succeeded at giving me exactly the feeling he meant it to. For me, that emotional ride is enough.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

                      The two trade reviews for this movie aren't good.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: The Pursuit of Happyness

                        Today I caught two movies I should have seen a long time ago.

                        This was one of them. I was stunned at how horrible it was.

                        The script was poorly written. All the voiceovers. Ugh! They were not effective and apparently the scribe thought by using them, he didn't have to fully couch the dramatic moments. The voice overs kept taking me out of the movie and I had a sense that someone was constantly guiding me and telling when to feel an emotion. Hence, I felt nothing.

                        The scenes in the commercials were better in isolation. Seeing all the scenes strung together was a vapid experience.

                        The Christopher character was not likeable and was morally hypocritical so it was hard to root for him. He was mean to his wife, he ripped off the cab driver but goes ballistic when anyone steals from him, he yells at his friend over $14 but he owes rent, taxes, parking tickets, etc. He assaults people in a shelter line and at a bus stop ... please don't ask me to feel sympathy. And the little boy was no worthy sympathy card, he should have sent him to live with relatives until he got settled. That was an unnecessary complication.

                        Plus, Will Smith turned in a pretty lethargic performance. I know he was supposed to be somber, but damn.

                        Don't get me started on how tough it is to like a movie with 80s clothes (members only jackets) and rubik's cubes. The cube?! Please don't use that as some mystical measure of intelligence ...it just came off so lame.

                        I could not wait until the movie was over. This should never be compared to In America, by the way.

                        In the end, I think it's good to know in our class system that hardship like this exists and exacts soul-killing pain ...and it's good to know through free trade, enterprise and capitalism people can transcend their poverty. But this story did not show that well artistically.

                        I will admit, I started the afternoon by seeing The Departed which is an amazingly well orchestrated piece. It was pretty brilliantly woven. So, then to see this ... was such a letdown. Why is it even still in the top 5 at the box office???
                        "The question isn't who will let me, but who is going to stop me?," -- Ayn Rand (via Howard Roark in The Fountainhead)

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X