Even in 1929 ...

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  • Even in 1929 ...

    Even as far back as 1929 Hollywood had its critics. The following is a quote from a book titled, "Trailing Geronimo" by Anton Mazzanovich, who was a member of the 6th Cavalry of Fort Apache during the Geronimo days.

    "... many so-called Wild West stories as shown on the silver sheet now-a-days are a reflection. In fact, an insult to the pioneers of our frontier of long ago, who from the time of the "Covered Wagon," opened the way for civilization to settle in the vast empire of the west.

    It is true that there were some bad "hombres," or so-called two-gun artists, scattered about, but their acting was not as bad or as foolish as some directors try to make the public believe. Producers should select Wild West stories which mean something. Don't give your patrons impossible situations or camera tricks. Remember that in the days of the open range, cowboys were cowboys, They did not have time to serve as deputy sheriffs. And dance halls were conducted on a strictly business proposition. So why flaunt dance hall scenes as it it were a society event, with the tough looking bar-keep and the gals whom you dress a la soubrette.

    I believe the popularity of Wild West melodrama will continue, as the romance of our frontier days is indeed interesting. The old West represents the best traditions of a race. So if our coming generation must have stories of the wild and woolly, project them on the screen as the people really were, and not like a flock of tin horns."

    from Trailing Geronimo by Anton Mazzanovich, c. 1929
    I know that not many of you are interested in the western genre, but I am amused at these comments. I am researching the history of the 6th Cavalry in Arizona and came across this quote.
    Last edited by billmarq; 02-15-2007, 11:24 AM. Reason: correct spelling of name
    We're making a movie here, not a film! - Kit Ramsey

  • #2
    Re: Even in 1929 ...

    I wonder if any critics lashed out at the notion that an ape could grow to 50 feet and climb skyscrapers?
    Teach me a fact and I'll learn.
    Tell me the truth and I'll believe.
    Tell me a story and it will live in my heart forever.

    - Native American proverb -

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    • #3
      Re: Even in 1929 ...

      That's a great idea for a title: "A Flock of Tin Horns"

      Interesting to note, the Wild West was about as distant when this was written as World War II is today.

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      • #4
        Re: Even in 1929 ...

        I saw a guy on TV who bounced a .45 bullet off a metal plate and hit a balloon downrange. Then he shot a .22 at an axe blade so it split and hit two balloons, one on either side of the blade.

        Then another guy threw eight clay pigeons into the air, underhand, and hit all eight with a pump shotgun before the last one hit the ground.

        Therefore, I believe every Old West legend is possible.

        Censorship reflects a society's lack of confidence in itself.
        It is a hallmark of an authoritarian regime.
        -- Potter Stewart

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        • #5
          Re: Even in 1929 ...

          Originally posted by haunted View Post
          Therefore, I believe every Old West legend is possible.
          So long as you remember dance halls were businesses, not society events.

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          • #6
            Re: Even in 1929 ...

            I always bring some coins for the sporting gals.

            Censorship reflects a society's lack of confidence in itself.
            It is a hallmark of an authoritarian regime.
            -- Potter Stewart

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            • #7
              Re: Even in 1929 ...

              ... whom you dress a la soubrette.

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              • #8
                Even Now

                Guess you Yanks haven't heard that Diamond Tooth Gertie's, (in Dawson City), is still open for business, eh?

                Didn't Mazzanovich mention, in his book, that he was in the 1918 version of THE LIGHT OF WESTERN STARS, (based upon a Zane Grey novel)?
                JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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                • #9

                  Halloween short script contest 2021 - deadline Oct 28
                  Win a year's subscription to Done Deal Pro!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Even in 1929 ...

                    I had to dig for it too, all that French gobbledegook wasn't much help.

                    The term "soubrette" originated to name a sort of character in French comedy. It describes a comic female character who is young and girlish, constantly flirtatious, coquettish and gossipy, and usually a chambermaid. Usually a sexual desire is displayed.

                    See also: French maid

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                    • #11
                      Re: Even in 1929 ...

                      I just can't believe Mazzanovich complained about that.

                      Censorship reflects a society's lack of confidence in itself.
                      It is a hallmark of an authoritarian regime.
                      -- Potter Stewart

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Then & Now

                        Dance hall girls: as they were back then, and as portrayed nowMoulin Rouge, in the "naughty nineties," (where women frequently displayed their petticoats and black silk stockings). The curvy and perky "soubrette" would be the French predecessor of the thin and slinky "vamp," (her stage role may have been a minor one, but she often stole the scenes and men's hearts with her charms).
                        JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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