A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

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  • medic1
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    i'm with Tochirto, I wasn't too thrilled with the movies this year. I'm thinkin' (hoping) 2014 will be better.

    I find myself being more critical with movies these days... and more bored.

    Leave a comment:


  • mge457
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Had a discussion with a studio exec about this very topic and we discussed one of their best picture nominees from last year, which financially did quite well. Last year, 6 of 10 best picture noms did over $100 million domestic box office (http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb...fice-20130224).

    Interestingly enough, my favorite was ALL IS LOST, which wasn't even nominated. 2013 was a great year for successful adult fare.

    Leave a comment:


  • nativeson
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by sc111 View Post
    Funny you should mention Lone Ranger. When it came out and got panned, we didn't see it in the theater. Especially since our 6th grade girl doesn't like westerns. ("Not enough action!" she says, "Nothing gets blown up!") But last night we were scrounging around On Demand for something to watch as a family. Though the kid was still resistant, we sold her on it.

    We all enjoyed it. The kid was having a grand old time with it and was happy to see things blow up. As a popcorn move it works.
    Pretty good, yeah. Fell victim to that bizarro anti big budget political movement. Bad timing, I guess. Nebraska was okay, but seemed to get heat because it's always nice to see Dern (and Keach) get back in the saddle IMO. Kool, older Keach film with a great twist: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081237/...m_flmg_act_148

    Leave a comment:


  • Cioccolato
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by jtwg50 View Post
    I think that is very good and encouraging news for those of us who like and want to write such movies. Let's hope the trend continues with 2014 releases!
    Here's hoping that executive minds are beginning to open, generally, to the benefits of a wider range of stories (and the idea that specs can bring them again).

    Leave a comment:


  • Geoff Alexander
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Dr. Vergerus View Post
    That's the thing, it's hard to argue about taste. I wish I liked it instead of being bored by it.
    Here's the thing, though. Whatever you thought of American Hustle, it wasn't "crap". Crap is something that lacks talented execution and intent. AH wasn't that. The Director had something specific in mind and he steered the ship all the way there. All of the technical elements ranged from good to excellent. The acting ranged from good to fantastic. So, no it wasn't crap.

    What aspiring writers need to do is be able to look at something and understand that, though they don't like it, it may have even bored them, that doesn't mean it's bad.

    Personally, I'm bored to tears by almost everything that Marvel has put out. Does that mean it's crap? No. No way. I just don't like it, there's a big difference.

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  • castilleja32
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Bananos: I agree with you about Mizoguchi: especially the brilliant Life of Oharu and Ugetsu from the 50s. Criterion also put out some of his early 30s work and even though the prints aren't very good those are wonderful also. - I think some of Mizoguchi's films can be watched on hulu plus, Criterion offers a lot of their films there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Yes, I've enjoyed some films from Mizoguchi, Ozu and Naruse too. But I still prefer Kurosawa. I like Japanese cinema in general, both classic and contemporary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bananos
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Dr. Vergerus View Post
    To me, Kurosawa or Bergman are way above Hichcock as filmmakers and auteurs. And the Apartment or Sunset Boulevard are way better than anything Hitchcock made.
    you should check out the films of kenji mizoguchi. he is japan's greatest. allthough the best film ever made is seppuku/hara kiri; spine tingling suspense all the way through, and one of the deepest and most effective critiques of the samurai class. it's a pure masterclass in storytelling as well as directing.

    as for the topic; i find it strange that you say call 2013 a year for intelligent films, then you list so few movies! i assure you 2013 is nothing special in that regard, in fact i would think it was a poor year for good movies. personally i did not see any movies last year that i thought was truly great. only one documentary, called "the act of killing" felt important. "the wolf of wallstreet" was a mess and because of it, lost its way. "american hustle" was nothing special, "nebraska" was just another alexander payne movie. "rush" was okay, but a very straight movie. i donn't know, if you ask me what movie i enjoyed the most in 2013 it would be something like "fast 6", just because it was ridiculous. maybe "the wolf" wins only because it had some cool scenes and funny characters. but it's a poor year in my book.

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  • castilleja32
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    I'm not sure if Hitchcock was always a "master of suspense"; some of the suspense plots in his movies are a little weak or underwritten and you can see what's coming.

    But I think he was truly a "master of set pieces." Sometimes an otherwise good movie seems lackluster just because it never really gets to a striking, memorable sequence.

    Foreign Correspondent has some great set pieces, and it just came out on a Criterion release after being hard to find on DVD for a while:

    http://www.avclub.com/review/criteri...-corres-201226

    Leave a comment:


  • sc111
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Tochirta View Post

    Lone Ranger - Surprisingly a good movie. Didn't blow my socks off but I thought the writing was very strong given that it's popcorn movie in the vein of Pirates.

    Funny you should mention Lone Ranger. When it came out and got panned, we didn't see it in the theater. Especially since our 6th grade girl doesn't like westerns. ("Not enough action!" she says, "Nothing gets blown up!") But last night we were scrounging around On Demand for something to watch as a family. Though the kid was still resistant, we sold her on it.

    We all enjoyed it. The kid was having a grand old time with it and was happy to see things blow up. As a popcorn move it works.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rantanplan
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Dr. Vergerus View Post

    And now someone could come and make a compelling case about how Hitchcock blows them all out of the water. It's all a matter of taste in the end.
    True. I think a lot of Hitchcock has NOT aged, that it's still some of the sharpest, fastest dialogue you can find on screen, and that sexual tension is often an incredibly strong element in his films. To me NOTORIOUS is his best: romantic as hell, suspenseful, gorgeous, funny in parts, with some famous camera moves and one of the most famous kisses in cinema.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    @Anagram: I think I've watched most Hitchcock's films, but I just find his style has aged badly. Recently I revisited Vertigo and I was just so bored by it. It's just not my thing, I guess.

    To me, Kurosawa or Bergman are way above Hichcock as filmmakers and auteurs. And the Apartment or Sunset Boulevard are way better than anything Hitchcock made.

    And now someone could come and make a compelling case about how Hitchcock blows them all out of the water. It's all a matter of taste in the end.

    Somewhere I've read this quote, apparently from Chekhov: "I know two kinds of art: art that I like and art that I don't." Or something along those lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tochirta
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Dr. Vergerus View Post
    Also, about films that are highly regarded: I'm sure you've probably noticed that, nowadays, every single film is highly regarded, there's always someone willing to call it "a masterpiece," not just in message boards but also professional reviewers and critics. We live in an age of low standards, or at least one where raving reviews are cheap (I don't mean they're paid for, just that there's too many of them). I don't know that it was different in the past, but time always puts things in their place. In twenty years nobody will be talking about Avatar beyond its role in the development of 3D filming.
    exactly. I'm VERY skeptical of hype nowadays.

    I find it hilarious that people are so quick to overrate shows/movies. Meanwhile, I remember when The Wire was on TV, and it got little-to-no critical acclaim. It got snubbed by the Emmys. And The Wire is clearly one of the best TV shows EVER made. EVER.

    meanwhile, from the first episode of True Detective/Breaking Bad, it's "omg this is the greatest show ever!"

    please. I'm so tired of it.

    Originally posted by SundownInRetreat View Post
    As Tochirta slates so many films seen and unseen it's completely valid to ask what films he/she actually likes and writes.
    that's a very good question. And I'll just say that I may post some stuff later to get an opinion. If you'd like I can PM you.

    I don't write derivative crap, that's for sure. It may not be great (yet), and I'm always learning to write better, but nothing I write is derivative.

    There's so much stuff being made now that strikes me as derivative crap. Whether it be mainstream or indie. I'm thinking: "I've seen this story a thousand times" or it's subject matter that's really arcane or not-so-relevant to the major issues of the world today. And I'm thinking "who cares?"

    And the level of craft isn't so superb for me to ignore that obvious problem.

    Yes, there's no accounting for taste. Cinema is first a matter of taste, THEN a matter of craft. I don't like melodrama and histrionics. In my mind, I think 'this is a cheap and somewhat dishonest way to get your point across.' American Hustle to me was full of that stuff. Some people LOVE over-the-top acting performances. And that's cool.

    I love nuance, but nuance that's to the point. Too vague is also a problem for me. In the middle works best.

    I'm also an action junkie. So I'm very hesitant to watch slow-burns and navelgazers. If it's a slow burn of some guy living in the forest, I just don't give a f*ck. If it's a slow burn examining a larger issue and the drama's really potent, I will watch happily.

    Things I sorta liked this year (I already mentioned 12 Years a Slave):

    Star Trek - Into Darkness. I have to say the plot was pretty engaging. It wasn't the greatest thing since sliced bread, but I found myself interested in what was going on. I'm not a Trekkie and I don't have extensive knowledge of the ST universe. But I found Khan intimidating and cool. It was my first time seeing Cumberbatch and I thought "Huh.... who is this guy? He's good."

    I liked (not loved, but liked) the fight scenes in Man of Steel. To me, some of the best "epic" fight scenes I've seen in a long time.

    Prisoners - A decent movie that kinda falls apart in the 3rd act imo.

    Lone Ranger - Surprisingly a good movie. Didn't blow my socks off but I thought the writing was very strong given that it's popcorn movie in the vein of Pirates.

    Wolf of Wall Street - Very topical film, and I love topical films. There's nothing better than watching a movie that feels relevant to what's going on in the world. I feel like this movie could have been really great, but it settled for displays of debauchery rather than narrative. I wanted to know how Belfort really made his money, the effect on his victims, if he ever encountered his victims directly, and a deeper examination on the business practices of "Wall Street" etc. Bottom line, I found there was not enough insight.

    Insight dramatized. That's what I crave in films.

    If there's something I absolutely must see, please recommend. I'm watching the Act of Killing now. I may get around to seeing "Her."

    Leave a comment:


  • Anagram
    replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Originally posted by Dr. Vergerus View Post
    Yes, for some reason I can't get into Hitchcock's either.
    Really? I would have guessed he was right up your alley for some reason.

    Have you seen Rear Window? That's the one that made me love him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: A fantastic year for intelligent adult films

    Yes, for some reason I can't get into Hitchcock's either.

    @Sundown: although I'm always curious about the films and scripts nominated for the Oscars, I don't think the Oscars are a clear indication of their quality. There's been some pretty questionable winners in any category, and there's sometimes a very transparent agenda. Like Bill said, it's a popularity contest.

    Also, about films that are highly regarded: I'm sure you've probably noticed that, nowadays, every single film is highly regarded, there's always someone willing to call it "a masterpiece," not just in message boards but also professional reviewers and critics. We live in an age of low standards, or at least one where raving reviews are cheap (I don't mean they're paid for, just that there's too many of them). I don't know that it was different in the past, but time always puts things in their place. In twenty years nobody will be talking about Avatar beyond its role in the development of 3D filming.

    But I get what you mean.

    Leave a comment:

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