It's A Wonderful Life

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  • It's A Wonderful Life

    at my dad's old house in the mountains of southwest virginia. watching an ancient, grainy VCR tape of It's a Wonderful Life on dad's 30 year-old floor model RCA TV. thing takes up half the living room. Great picture. Small screen. Just watched (again by a bunch) young George Bailey get his bad ear hit by his druggist boss for not making his delivery, and young George trying to plead to his boss that he had messed up the capsules. Story then jumps forward twenty or so years with George looking at luggage to make his escape.

    just doesn't get better sometimes watching an old movie, in an old house, on an old tv, from old technology (sure i misspelled that last word).

  • #2
    Re: it's a wonderful life

    I keep hoping at least ONE of my kids would embrace my love of films that came out before color.... but I keep getting, "Not ANOTHER black and white movie?!?!?!"
    *SIGH* At least the dogs will sit through them with me (But only if they get to sit on the couch...)

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    • #3
      Re: it's a wonderful life

      Ah, yes. Nothing better than relaxing in front of the telly with a classic Black & White movie! These days one's television set is likely to be large enough to be considered a home theater. To watch a B&W film on this technology is wonderful (so, yes, movie fans, it is a wonderful life!).

      When story mattered in moviemaking, these colorless creative filmmaking efforts, taken all together, are an essential part of a filmmaking history story. It's the part of the storytelling process where actions speak louder than words. The Artist found itself on the Academy Awards podium because of its ability to speak to us.

      Time and again, many a B&W film proves itself more colorful than many of its color counterparts. With 256 shades of gray to lend visual depth to a layered story, the B&W film watching experience is exhilarating for those willing to suspend their disbelief. Regardless of the difference of years, B&W films -- with or without sound (MOS - mute on sound) -- hold their value because their storytelling is laid bare in black and white, uncluttered with the distractions of color, and so also how and why many such movies continue to endure in our hearts and minds.

      Last edited by Clint Hill; 12-11-2015, 07:55 AM.
      "If you're going to have a story, have a big story, or none at all." — Joseph Campbell

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      • #4
        Re: It's A Wonderful Life

        Okay, I'm printing that out and taping it to the TV...

        (But seriously, you'd think with a dozen kids still roaming around this house, SOMEONE would be on my side...)

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        • #5
          Re: it's a wonderful life

          Originally posted by DangoForth View Post
          I keep hoping at least ONE of my kids would embrace my love of films that came out before color.... but I keep getting, "Not ANOTHER black and white movie?!?!?!"
          I can't understand the resistance.

          These days, digital grading has become so excessive that many films practically look as if they were shot in black and white and merely had a teal-green filter applied.

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          • #6
            Re: It's A Wonderful Life

            There are thousands of really bad B&W films, but they can stay in the archives for posterity. Luckily, there are also hundreds of very good black and white films available.

            The young-uns can't understand how I admire the lighting and shadowing in Casablanca...so as a black and white starter for the younger generations I lean towards Young Frankenstein (1974). And if you really have to sneak things up on them film by film, there is a very good brown and white film called Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid that almost passes for a color film.

            Now if I can just get the nieces and nephews to accept that It Happened One Night is the great-grand-mother of all Romantic Comedies...

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