Passengers

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  • #31
    Re: Passengers

    Originally posted by magnet360 View Post
    I'm saying it's irrelevant if his decisions are weak.
    I very much beg to differ. Regardless of whether or not a character makes a "wrong" or "right" decision (which I don't care about), they should have a strong motivation for that decision. Otherwise they're just passive characters. His motivation was strong in that he didn't want to spend decades alone.

    Originally posted by magnet360 View Post
    I'm just using that example because people are obsessing over Chris Pratt's questionable decision. If you must argue that point. Then why didn't Jennifer Lawrence go to sleep in the found pod. Why did she choose to stay awake for the remainder of the trip?
    Again, I didn't see the movie, but I assume you mean there was a found pod after Pratt's character almost died trying to save the ship. If that's the case, then I think she chose to stay awake because having helped save him so she'd have companionship, she gained a greater understanding of his decision to wake her up.

    Originally posted by magnet360 View Post
    That doesn't make the movie bad. It's weak logic to judge movies on a characters decisions.
    I never made the argument that the movie was bad due to his character's decision. Not sure where you're getting that from.
    "I love being a writer. What I can't stand is the paperwork.-- Peter De Vries

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    • #32
      Re: Passengers

      I saw this tonight and while I didn't think it was a great movie (many of its flaws have already been pointed out), I also didn't come away hating it as much as nmstevens.

      2/4 stars

      It would have been interesting to see if Chris Pratt's character could garner more pathos if he had made an impulsive decision to unfreeze JLaw, and then regretted it and tortured himself, rather than debating it forever and then pretending like nothing happened after the deed had been done.

      I also hated the constant establishing shots from outside the ship while the two lovers were in the midst of their trysts. We already have a hard time viewing their relationship--knowing what we know-- that in between sex shots we don't need to be sledgehammered with visuals reminding us what he did over and over again. There they are ****ing and looking great together and having fun; but wait! Cut to: shots reminding us that he gave her a death sentence on this murderous space cruise. We got that already, thanks!

      ----------

      I think the biggest thing about this movie though was, as one reviewer stated, it had billion dollar ideas but five cent guts. Everything is there for a psychological thriller, or a sci-fi horror, or at least a survival film, with a little bit of dark romance thrown in, but instead we get a ridiculous, happy-ending love story that faced many intriguing questions yet answered none. Ultimately a hijacked and disappointing film.

      At least there was Jennifer Lawrence though. I have to admit that I've never really had a thing for her previously--I never questioned her acting ability but thought her looks were always overrated. But wow, she looks incredibly sexy in this film, without looking desperate or distasteful, which is a rare combination.

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      • #33
        Re: Passengers

        I finally caught this and I really enjoyed it. It's been a long while since I've "really enjoyed" a film. There was enough space stuff, enough romance, and enough suspense to keep me entertained and engaged. Which in my book, is saying a lot these days. There were moments that were magical --the beauty of space well treated. I think the guy's moral dilemma was very clearly established. And the girl found something she had (searched for? evaded?) never found yet, despite her brains and interesting life: love. The short bit with her girlfriends saying a lasting goodbye made that very clear. To me, this film was the kind of film that makes you love film.

        I do think the moral dilemma is interesting, and beyond the question of how selfish his decision was (but let's face it, EXTREME circumstances here, which makes us all question what we would do, which makes it all the more interesting), there is, I suppose, another inherent question: to what extent is love always a bit selfish? Or rather: isn't it always, on some level?

        And speaking of selfish, the ending made it clear that they made a very selfLESS decision: not to have kids. They selflessly chose not to experience the (selfish?) joy of parenthood because it would have sentenced their kid(s) to a life of loneliness. Instead, they created life other ways. So I thought that was pretty poetic. And even beyond that gesture, there's sort of this haunting poetry about two people being the only living souls in the vast, silent, cold, but beautiful expanse of space.

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        • #34
          Re: Passengers

          Extremely interesting rearranging of the film and how shuffling the first act to the second affects how you view the characters.


          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gksxu-yeWcU

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          • #35
            Re: Passengers

            I finally saw this film last night -- a YouTube rental -- and I'm kicking myself for listening to the critics enough not to view the film in the theaters. I should know by now that 90% of the time the critics loathe something, it will be good, and vice versa, but I still allowed myself to be guided by their biases. Fool me twice, shame on me.

            Which is to say, I loved this film. Loved it. And I only wish that I'd seen it in the cinema, to get the proper impact.

            I found the Chris Pratt character to be very sympathetic and his loneliness predicament (if not his career choice and such) completely relatable.

            Do I care about some people's hand-wringing about the supposed "ethics" of his choice? LOL. No. No, to the point of laughing at those who are so supposedly concerned about it. (Because, what, it will lead to an epidemic of men waking up beautiful women in suspended animation?)

            Pratt's choice created a powerful dramatic irony that energized the film and created a seemingly insurmountable boy-loses-girl crisis, one which engaged me completely. Indeed, I consider this to be one of the best-ever boy-loses-girl scenarios.

            I adore Jennifer Lawrence's look, and in this film, I loved her character too. Besides her oh-my-god beauty, she really is an outstanding actress, which came to the fore in the scene in which she thought that she had lost Pratt for good and all, and was beyond distraught at the prospect. Completely convincing.

            The defiantly traditionalist identities of both lead characters was a breath of fresh air in the turn-everything-and-everyone-upside-down-from-tradition norms of filmmaking today. The man who is seeking a place for himself in a world where his traditional male skills are more needed than in our globalized, politically hypercorrected McSociety -- that is a compelling idea, touching on the bold pioneering spirit that used to guide men in centuries past, the loss of which is leading to such malaise in parts of society today.

            And the Jennifer Lawrence arc, discovering that traditional pair bonding is something that she finds fulfilling -- well, it's almost gotten to the point where that kind of arc is forbidden. So it too was a welcome element.

            The visuals were breathtaking, even on my computer screen. (I can only imagine what the film looked like in IMAX.) The film evoked a real sense of wonder, even awe, at times.

            I was emotionally gripped, I was in genuine suspense at the end, and, for once, I loved a modern movie's themes as well. These days, one could hardly ask for more.

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            • #36
              Re: Passengers

              I saw it last night, with my wife. She knew nothing about this movie. For almost two hours she patiently and quietly watched it.

              When it was finished I asked her:

              "Well?"

              "I'm still p*ssed at how selfish he was."

              And that's all she said.
              "I just couldn't live in a world without me."

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Passengers

                Originally posted by karsten View Post
                I finally saw this film last night -- a YouTube rental -- and I'm kicking myself for listening to the critics enough not to view the film in the theaters. I should know by now that 90% of the time the critics loathe something, it will be good, and vice versa, but I still allowed myself to be guided by their biases. Fool me twice, shame on me.

                Which is to say, I loved this film. Loved it. And I only wish that I'd seen it in the cinema, to get the proper impact.

                I found the Chris Pratt character to be very sympathetic and his loneliness predicament (if not his career choice and such) completely relatable.

                Do I care about some people's hand-wringing about the supposed "ethics" of his choice? LOL. No. No, to the point of laughing at those who are so supposedly concerned about it. (Because, what, it will lead to an epidemic of men waking up beautiful women in suspended animation?)

                Pratt's choice created a powerful dramatic irony that energized the film and created a seemingly insurmountable boy-loses-girl crisis, one which engaged me completely. Indeed, I consider this to be one of the best-ever boy-loses-girl scenarios.

                I adore Jennifer Lawrence's look, and in this film, I loved her character too. Besides her oh-my-god beauty, she really is an outstanding actress, which came to the fore in the scene in which she thought that she had lost Pratt for good and all, and was beyond distraught at the prospect. Completely convincing.

                The defiantly traditionalist identities of both lead characters was a breath of fresh air in the turn-everything-and-everyone-upside-down-from-tradition norms of filmmaking today. The man who is seeking a place for himself in a world where his traditional male skills are more needed than in our globalized, politically hypercorrected McSociety -- that is a compelling idea, touching on the bold pioneering spirit that used to guide men in centuries past, the loss of which is leading to such malaise in parts of society today.

                And the Jennifer Lawrence arc, discovering that traditional pair bonding is something that she finds fulfilling -- well, it's almost gotten to the point where that kind of arc is forbidden. So it too was a welcome element.

                The visuals were breathtaking, even on my computer screen. (I can only imagine what the film looked like in IMAX.) The film evoked a real sense of wonder, even awe, at times.

                I was emotionally gripped, I was in genuine suspense at the end, and, for once, I loved a modern movie's themes as well. These days, one could hardly ask for more.
                I agree. I saw it in the theater 3 times because I loved it so much. The movie took a daring choice. Typically, movies are so afraid of making their lead "unlikable" that it becomes predictable and safe. Pratt's choice really put a ticking clock tension cloud over the entire movie and you could feel it really drive the movie. How are you going to have characters go through something if you don't really challenge them. I think critics were just being social justice warriors--you see some of the movies they champion and it feels like they're just saying what they think makes them sound. Besides the story, those space scenes were just gorgeous....kind of romantic...to walk out and enjoy space like that. Plus the Pratt character redeemed himself (spoilers) by sacrificing himself in the end.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Passengers

                  I enjoyed Passengers a lot, despite catching it really late (partly due to the bad reviews).

                  The concept was interesting and Chris Pratt was a charming lead, whilst he did the wrong thing you could understand his reasons for doing so. I can't say it was a masterpiece because it was a bit too hokey, but it engaged me and not many films do. Martin Sheen was great as the bartender and the look of the ship was intriguing as well.

                  I wish they made more sci-fi films like this tbh.

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