Glass

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  • Glass

    Although I had high hopes for Glass, now I'm on the fence about seeing it; many reviews do not flatter it. Has anyone seen it and what was your opinion of it?
    "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

  • #2
    Re: Glass

    Originally posted by TigerFang View Post
    Although I had high hopes for Glass, now I'm on the fence about seeing it; many reviews do not flatter it. Has anyone seen it and what was your opinion of it?

    I actually liked it. Not as good as SPLIT...but pretty good.

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    • #3
      Re: Glass

      Today I saw the film Glass, directed by M. Night Shyamalan. All the good I can say about it is that it has excellent audio editing to enhance and empower the fight scenes to make up for the lack of realized cinematic superhuman destruction. The film editing itself was also excellent.

      The writing was not impressive for me either, though, as it was a showcase of “tell, don’t show” throughout the film. Even some of the cinematography lingered too long on shot compositions that did not “tell” much and in which there was no action. They were there for their so-called beauty, but they amounted to the equivalent of cinematographic purple prose.

      It was also a good thing that the director and editor decided to cut out as many as possible of Shyamalan’s overacted, almost comical, facial expressions in his scene early on in the film. It's “cool” that directors would like to put themselves in their moving pictures. I understand that part of their ego. But if they’re going to do that, then they ought to have some acting ability, even if it’s unproven; it just must be there. John Huston was a great actor and an excellent director, but when he mixed the two, he did it well.

      The person with whom I saw the movie vaguely recalled Unbreakable (which I genuinely liked,) and neither of us had seen the movie Split. Not seeing those two films in advance was a detriment to our viewing experience of Glass, as it turns out. My philosophy is that a movie ought to be able to stand on its legs and have its story comprehended by a new audience member as well as anyone familiar with the original and any sequels. The “Jason Bourne” character’s films do that. Anyone can watch any of them and not be “lost” by the storyline for want of seeing any of the other related movies.

      Having the Glass storyline be comprehended by a new audience member turned out not to be the case for my friend, who found that there was too much information that they were expected to understand from gathering it from the previous two related films. To rely on an audience member to see other movies before they see another installment is not a safe bet by the director.

      For anyone on the fence about paying to see this movie in a theater, wait until it’s on cable if you want to see it at all.
      Last edited by TigerFang; 02-10-2019, 05:28 PM.
      "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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      • #4
        Re: Glass

        Originally posted by TigerFang View Post
        Today I saw the film Glass, directed by M. Night Shyamalan. All the good I can say about it is that it has excellent audio editing to enhance and empower the fight scenes to make up for the lack of realized cinematic superhuman destruction. The film editing itself was also excellent.

        The writing was not impressive for me either, though, as it was a showcase of "tell, don't show- throughout the film. Even some of the cinematography lingered too long on shot compositions that did not "tell- much and in which there was no action. They were there for their so-called beauty, but they amounted to the equivalent of cinematographic purple prose.

        It was also a good thing that the director and editor decided to cut out as many as possible of Shyamalan's overacted, almost comical, facial expressions in his scene early on in the film. It's "cool- that directors would like to put themselves in their moving pictures. I understand that part of their ego. But if they're going to do that, then they ought to have some acting ability, even if it's unproven; it just must be there. John Huston was a great actor and an excellent director, but I don't know that he ever mixed the two.

        The person with whom I saw the movie vaguely recalled Unbreakable (which I genuinely liked,) and neither of us had seen the movie Split. Not seeing those two films in advance was a detriment to our viewing experience of Glass, as it turns out. My philosophy is that a movie ought to be able to stand on its legs and have its story comprehended by a new audience member as well as anyone familiar with the original and any sequels. The "Jason Bourne- character's films do that. Anyone can watch any of them and not be "lost- by the storyline for want of seeing any of the other related movies.

        Having the Glass storyline be comprehended by a new audience member turned out not to be the case for my friend, who found that there was too much information that they were expected to understand from gathering it from the previous two related films. To rely on an audience member to see other movies before they see another installment is not a safe bet by the director.

        For anyone on the fence about paying to see this movie in a theater, wait until it's on cable if you want to see it at all.



        I had the opposite experience. I liked it a lot, after seeing both Unbreakable (a brilliant shaggy dog deconstruction of the superhero and villain archetypes) and Split (a slow burn horror story that's a sneaky second act). The "show, don't tell" element echoed the narrative I've seen a lot in anime TV series and film. Plus, it's nice to see Bruce Willis out of direct to video hell.


        I think it's an bad idea to compare Shyalaman's Philadelphia Trilogy to the likes of Jason Bourne and other franchises because it's a deconstruction of those franchises, let the comic book genre, while echoing the better works like "Watchmen" and "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns" with a mix of "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" (Sarah Paulson is working on a prequel series for Nextflix) and "Silence Of The Lambs".
        "A screenwriter is much like being a fire hydrant with a bunch of dogs lined up around it.- -Frank Miller

        "A real writer doesn't just want to write; a real writer has to write." -Alan Moore

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