1917

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  • #16
    Re: 1917

    Originally posted by Done Deal Pro View Post
    No one was doing 40 minute takes, of course. As you can see/learn from the video below, they rehearsed and rehearsed and rehearsed. They built sets specifically to allow for filming. They put an amazing amount of time in before the cameras ever rolled. They basically filmed a play, so to speak.

    In this day & age of VFX, one can trick the eye, especially during a moment of action. The longest takes were roughly 8 1/2 to 9 minutes, which is a still a lot especially when you are there in person; but infinitely more realistic and manageable than 15 minutes or more, obviously. They "shot around 65 days."

    Incredible planning and preparation was the key. Models of sets. Walk-throughs. Tests. More rehearsals the day of. And patience.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMBnvz-dEXw

    Thanks Will. That's very fascinating.


    I am still buzzing at what I saw. I was actively looking for where they could cut and it kept going and going. The degree of difficulty kept rising from running action scenes to full on battle scenes....all seemingly seamless. It wasn't just a gimmick....it really added to the storytelling. I don't think I've ever seen a war film that looked like this. I've pretty much seen every way of telling a war story...and they managed to come up with a fresh way of telling it. It looked more like 1917 than the actual documentary about World War 1 that was released last year.

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    • #17
      Re: 1917

      Just saw the youtube video. Even if it wasn't one continuous take, they must have to be very precise to match the scenes to make it look like one take. I am sure film students will be copying this like the way they did Citizen Kane and Hitchcock.

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      • #18
        Re: 1917

        Originally posted by Friday View Post
        Just saw the youtube video. Even if it wasn't one continuous take, they must have to be very precise to match the scenes to make it look like one take. I am sure film students will be copying this like the way they did Citizen Kane and Hitchcock.
        I hope film students spend more time studying Eisenstein's montage theory than these gimmicky stunts that don't really serve the ultimate story they're trying to tell

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        • #19
          Re: 1917

          Originally posted by JoeBanks View Post
          I hope film students spend more time studying Eisenstein's montage theory than these gimmicky stunts that don't really serve the ultimate story they're trying to tell
          Hats off to Roger Deakins and his camera crew for bringing to life a fictional World War I soldier’s experience cultivated from Sam Mendes’s memories of the war stories of Mendes’s grandfather, author Alfred Mendes.

          Whether or not the technique best served the story, only Time will tell. The methods used were one way to tell the story, a way that seems different from all others in contention for the Academy Awards this year. “Give me the same thing, only different.” Isn’t that the mantra of the Hollywood producer? Regardless, it was quite a challenge to carry it off, and the collaborative efforts of the team of cast and crew met that challenge and then some.

          “1917” was a fine feat of camera choreography, and, as ever, there will be no stopping aspiring cinematographers from giving it the sincerest form of flattery through imitation.

          Why do I so ardently believe the film is great? My longtime girlfriend — someone who is not your usual war movie fanatic — was the one who wanted to go see it, not I. She said it looked “interesting” to her. When it was over she said that she “loved it!” That’s high praise coming from her, and, as she put it, over a story that was not about the war itself.
          Last edited by TigerFang; 01-17-2020, 07:37 PM.
          "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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          • #20
            Re: 1917

            Throughout the film 1917, I looked for Tristan Ludlow as he tried to save his brother Samuel hung up on barbed-wire before the German soldiers crucified him with machine-gun fire, but I must have missed it because I did not see it in there.
            "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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            • #21
              Re: 1917

              This was the most visually impressive movie I've seen in years, and a good movie in its own right. Certainly one of the best of last year. This and Tarantino Hollywood might be my favorites.

              Not sure how I'd rank it as far as war movies go. Overall I think I'd still put Saving Private Ryan above it. Maybe Fury and Beasts of No Nation as well but I'd have to watch all of them again. None of those look as clean but I recall them affecting me more emotionally.

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