The Gentlemen

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  • The Gentlemen

    The bar has been set very high for 2020! Best and funniest gangster film I've seen in years.

    It's like a Tarantino movie without the self-indulgence.
    TimeStorm & Blurred Vision Book info & blog: https://stormingtime.com//

  • #2
    Re: The Gentlemen

    High Grant was a blast. Picking up where he left off in Paddington 2.

    If you like this, check out Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch.

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    • #3
      Re: The Gentlemen

      Originally posted by SundownInRetreat View Post
      High Grant was a blast. Picking up where he left off in Paddington 2.

      If you like this, check out Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch.
      I'm not a fan of either of those two movies, though I haven't seen them since they came out, but The Gentlemen hit the spot for me.

      I agree about Grant. He's getting better and better.
      TimeStorm & Blurred Vision Book info & blog: https://stormingtime.com//

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      • #4
        Re: The Gentlemen

        Originally posted by hscope View Post
        The bar has been set very high for 2020! Best and funniest gangster film I've seen in years.

        It's like a Tarantino movie without the self-indulgence.

        I always thought Ritchie was the British Tarantino, but without the exploitation element, and he does get into self-indulgence too. Bricktop's speech from "Snatch", for example:

        https://youtu.be/u3qy4Zv4snI
        "A screenwriter is much like being a fire hydrant with a bunch of dogs lined up around it.- -Frank Miller

        "A real writer doesn't just want to write; a real writer has to write." -Alan Moore

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        • #5
          Re: The Gentlemen

          I don't think that's self-indulgence. I think it was well-timed and appropriate. Bricktop had been seen throughout the film up until this point and not much known about him, let alone why an average-looking middle-aged guy (no height, muscles or scars) should be so feared. He also loomed over several characters and storylines and thus his speech was an explanation to the audience as much as it was the guys in the scene. The entire scene - from his taking a dead body in his stride to his speech told us all we needed to know about the guy.

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          • #6
            Re: The Gentlemen

            Saw this last night. I thought it was a well written, ingenious film. I don't usually go into heavy dialog films, and Guy Ritchie is known for it, but this was phenom.

            All the players did a great job. The story had good pacing.

            I even like the beer brand shown throughout the film. Gritchie beer. G. Ritchie....lol

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            • #7
              Re: The Gentlemen

              I saw this yesterday and enjoyed much of it. But I was rooting for Hugh Grant's character over McConaghey's, and I would have been fine with ending it at Hugh's pitch meeting.

              Hugh seemed to be having a blast doing his best Michael Caine impersonation and I liked seeing Michelle Dockery in something so far from Downton.

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              • #8
                Re: The Gentlemen

                Originally posted by Darthclaw13 View Post
                I even like the beer brand shown throughout the film. Gritchie beer. G. Ritchie....lol
                I wanted to add to my earlier post. I honestly thought the Gritchie beer brand in the film was fake. But after looking it up I found it's a real thing.

                Guy Ritchie loves beer so much he opened his own brewery.

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                • #9
                  Re: The Gentlemen

                  Just rewatched this. What a film. Great characters and even greater dialogue. Tarantino has some corker one-liners and monologues but The Gentlemen is relentless in its sheer poetry. from solo cadenzas to intertwining interplay of multiple characters - it's a dazzling masterclass in rhyming, rhythmic rhetoric - especially Hugh Grant. Charlie Hunnam gets the scene-stealing award with the way he controls an entire room for several minutes though it's Matthew McConnagaggahauaghey who wins out with his 'foolish dragon/wise lion' fable.

                  This film is how you do dialogue.

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