Dramatic Villians

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  • Pen Dragon
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Brian Donlevy as Sgt. Markoff in Beau Geste.

    Bruce Dern in The Cowboys

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  • vmf
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    The Kurgan in Highlander.

    Clancy Brown is/was awesome at playing bad guys, like Hadley in Shawshank, but I think this one is his best. A creepy, virtually-unstoppable villain, and his exchanges with Connery are classic.

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  • vmf
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Originally posted by insanegenius
    Prescribe halt with the screenwriter talk just a minute. Would you intoduce a guy like Tony M. to your daughter? Alright. Protag whatever Say goodbye to the bad guy.
    Yeah, this argument comes up once in a while, and I side with you on it.

    We have the usual protag/antag definitions, but these have nothing to do with whether he/she is a good or bad person, under society's rules.

    I subscribe to the villain in the "a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately" meaning, rather than tying it completely to the antagonist definition used for fictional work.

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  • billythrilly7
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Jaime O'Hara played by Vince Vaughn in Rudy.

    But he made up for it, by getting a score for Rudy.

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  • insanegenius
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Prescribe halt with the screenwriter talk just a minute. Would you intoduce a guy like Tony M. to your daughter? Alright. Protag whatever Say goodbye to the bad guy.

    Leave a comment:


  • prescribe22
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    All of you are wrong. The best villain ever put to film was Tony Montana aka Scarface. I still can't believe Pacino didn't win an oscar for that role. When people talk about a character that came out about twenty years ago and talk about him like he came out yesterday that's best villain worthy." Say Hello to my little friend"
    I would side with you... only if he was actually the villain in the story. He was the protag.

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  • insanegenius
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    All of you are wrong. The best villain ever put to film was Tony Montana aka Scarface. I still can't believe Pacino didn't win an oscar for that role. When people talk about a character that came out about twenty years ago and talk about him like he came out yesterday that's best villain worthy." Say Hello to my little friend"

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  • AnconRanger
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    michael corleone

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  • Authorized
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Cruella De Vil. Best villain Disney ever created next to Eisner...

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  • miles
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Any villian (malkovich) who can speak softly over the phone and make Eastwood clench his jaw and squint in anger has my vote.

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  • prescribe22
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Captain Hadley in The Shawshank Redemption.
    I was going to say the Warden.

    He does some very cruel things, but you can see the decision he makes and why he makes it. Andy is sort of the forbidden fruit for him. Andy can help him get rich. So when it is revealed that Andy is innocent of his crime and should be released, the Warden is placed in a very tight spot. Let Andy go and risk getting caught for his transgressions, or get rid of the evidence. He does the latter and we hate him for it.

    Ironically enough, I never liked PLATOON all that much. And a lot of it had to do with the characters. They seemed very one dimensional to me. Thinly veiled metaphors for Stone's views on society and politics, IMHO. I find this to be true for most of his films. The decisions his characters make all seem to have intended purposes that are not intrinsically tied to the drama within the story itself, IMO. They don't seem like actual players in the micro aspects of the stories, but rather pawns in Stone's macro message.

    When the Warden in Shawshank decides to kill the kid and cover the evidence exonerating Andy, however, I can see exactly why he did it. He dug himself into a hole and he had one easy way out of it. In his mind he couldn't just let Andy go, or his world could come crashing down around him. He was reacting to the drama in the story. Not just killing because the author wanted to show that authority is the root of evil or some abstract belief. The Warden was simply exhibiting the ugly side of human behavior. He was acting out of self interest within the framework of the story.

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  • le kilt
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Darabont, I think, also does a fine job in the GREEN MILE; although "Wild Bill" (Rockwell) is as ott a villain as there is, the prison guard, Percy, really got under my skin as a character.

    Characters in powerful institutional positions who abuse their power, victimising those under them, often make excellent villains. The head sister who runs the reformatory in the MAGDALENE SISTERS, played by Geraldine McEwan, is a thoroughly despicable character but in the context, realistic too; especially as the story was based on true events, and according to its writer-director, Peter Mullan, even toned down so it wouldn't be completely unpalatable.

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  • whitenavel
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    Captain Hadley in The Shawshank Redemption.

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  • MacG
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    True, it's a subject of debate as to whether he or Bill was the actual villian on SILENCE, but not in HANNIBAL or RED DRAGON. As such, I'd plop him on the list....

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  • Writer1
    replied
    Re: Dramatic Villians

    LITTLE BILL in UNFORGIVEN...he was wicked, but the townsfolk loved/feared and wanted him to act that way. He was a very human character who didn't see himself as a villain...but as virtuous. That's usually the most wicked sort.

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