2020 Original Blacklist Scripts

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  • #46
    Originally posted by sc111 View Post

    There have been comedies adapted from novels, too. Mrs. Doubtfire comes to mind.
    Crazy Rich Asians! Sideways! This is Where I Leave You (probably not well known, but I loved it), Silver Linings Playbook, A Man Called Ove... One of the best adaptations I've seen from a non-fiction piece of work is the limited series Unbelievable. I read the original article, An Unbelievable Story of Rape, in ProPublica. I checked the word count and it was 10-12k words, if my memory is accurate. The original article is amazing and then they spun it into 8 episodes running 45-55 minutes long, and it never drags.

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    • #47
      Crazy Rich Asians! Sideways! This is Where I Leave You (probably not well known, but I loved it), Silver Linings Playbook, A Man Called Ove... One of the best adaptations I've seen from a non-fiction piece of work is the limited series Unbelievable. I read the original article, An Unbelievable Story of Rape, in ProPublica. I checked the word count and it was 10-12k words, if my memory is accurate. The original article is amazing and then they spun it into 8 episodes running 45-55 minutes long, and it never drags.
      lostfootage You derailed it again. lol.

      Back on the BL topic:

      Anyone know what % of the original BL scripts were produced since BL's inception (broken by the year)? How many were considered commercial successful? Google search yields a Wikipedia list that I'm having a hard time believing. But then, I've been more wrong than right....

      --fallen

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      • #48
        100% were considered successful because they made the Black List by my math...

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        • #49
          Originally posted by fallenangel View Post
          lostfootage You derailed it again. lol.

          Back on the BL topic:

          Anyone know what % of the original BL scripts were produced since BL's inception (broken by the year)? How many were considered commercial successful? Google search yields a Wikipedia list that I'm having a hard time believing. But then, I've been more wrong than right....

          --fallen
          I don't understand. The list of all Black List scripts that went on to be produced is in the link you provided. You think it's incorrect? Or fake?
          Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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          • #50
            All i know is there are a lot of movies I meant to read specs of on the BL -- that got made into movies during my procrastination -- and now I should at least see the movies. I'm so behind on so many of these.

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            • #51
              I don't understand. The list of all Black List scripts that went on to be produced is in the link you provided. You think it's incorrect? Or fake?
              sc111 I stand corrected. I was skeptical when I saw titles such as The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (2008), X-Men Origins: Wolverine, The Expendables (No way Studios would pass on 'em) on Wiki as a part 2005 BL. Looking at the list from recent years, my guess is that BL shifted their program goals from listing material from established writers/studios to ones from aspiring writers. The shrinking list of Produced titles in recent years backs that assumption.

              -- fallen

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              • #52
                Fallen -- I'm very confused by your posts in this thread. What are you trying to tell us? I'm honestly not getting it. I think you may have a thought on the matter, but it's not coming through clearly to me.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by fallenangel View Post
                  sc111 I stand corrected. I was skeptical when I saw titles such as The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (2008), X-Men Origins: Wolverine, The Expendables (No way Studios would pass on 'em) on Wiki as a part 2005 BL. Looking at the list from recent years, my guess is that BL shifted their program goals from listing material from established writers/studios to ones from aspiring writers. The shrinking list of Produced titles in recent years backs that assumption.

                  -- fallen
                  Not entirely accurate. There are scripts on the Black List in recent years that were written by pros with previous credits. There are scripts on the current 2020 list written by pros with previous credits.

                  As for the "shrinking" you mention, if you check the dates of production, the "shrinking" of produced BL scripts is due to the time it takes to get a film funded, into production and released.

                  For example, "The American" was on the 2005 Black List and was written by a pro writer with previous credits. But it took five years until it was released in 2010. "Bohemian Rhapsody" was on the 2007 Black List, it wasn't produced and released until 2018. Eleven years! And the writer was already an established novelist and playwright before he made the 2007 Black List.

                  I have to say, with no ill intent toward you, I am puzzled by what seems like an effort to downplay the talent of the writers on the Black List.


                  Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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                  • #54
                    I have to say, with no ill intent toward you, I am puzzled by what seems like an effort to downplay the talent of the writers on the Black List.
                    My apologies to the board if my posts allude to anything negative regarding the BL writers talent. That was never my intent. It all started with a personal opinion in response to "the bar is high" . After reading BL2020 loglines and several script pages and those, when stacked against some of my favorite produced scripts way back from the 1940's (genre neutral), I was (still am) underwhelmed. Again, my opinion. Guess I was expecting Amadeus and instead, I saw Salieri. Both are accomplished artists. It is clear that my expectations were misaligned. That does (should) not translate to downplaying of talent.

                    Fallen -- I'm very confused by your posts in this thread. What are you trying to tell us? I'm honestly not getting it. I think you may have a thought on the matter, but it's not coming through clearly to me.
                    Most on the board would disagree, but to me a successful script = commercial success of a film. It's all about $$$. Exceptions are always there, but those are just...exceptions. Produced Script question I asked was related to that aspect, Bono. In one of the posts, you mentioned that BL represents .000x% of all the BL scripts. I was curious to see how BL scripts corelate to BO numbers (if produced). That's all...

                    Peace out....

                    --fallen

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                    • #55
                      Okay Fallen -- you were talking about Box Office. That's a whole other ballgame. So yes, I would disagree as if you judged a script success by commercial success, than Look Who's Talking is one of the best scripts of all time. I love that movie, but you see what I'm saying. And I choose a well liked movie -- but there are 10000 examples of terrible movies that made a ton.

                      Also great specs become bad movies. Bad scripts become great movies. Movie making is weird and hard.

                      And you don't have to apologize. I like the other side of arguments.

                      Mostly I'd say reading specs that did well recently is a good way to judge your talent. Don't only read scripts that made the black list though.

                      However, Fallen if you're comparing your writing to 1940 and not 2020 -- that's gonna be hard way to judge if your goal is to sell a spec in present day.

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                      • #56
                        Okay Fallen -- you were talking about Box Office. That's a whole other ballgame. So yes, I would disagree as if you judged a script success by commercial success, than Look Who's Talking is one of the best scripts of all time. I love that movie, but you see what I'm saying. And I choose a well liked movie -- but there are 10000 examples of terrible movies that made a ton..
                        Look who's Talking was a funny movie and made a ton of money for Tristar. A great story will find its way to the masses. And that, translates to $$$. I have yet to find an exception. Ofc, there are stories we find compelling at a personal level that were rejected by the audience, the ones we feel deserved love. But in the end, audience is never wrong.

                        However, Fallen if you're comparing your writing to 1940 and not 2020 -- that's gonna be hard way to judge if your goal is to sell a spec in present day.
                        What I meant was, story telling via a visual medium (aka Cinema) is timeless. Great writing is just that...Great. Casablanca and Sunset Boulevard continue to awe me. (Yes, I still re-read those scripts). Sure, elements within screenwriting have changed (compressed sentences, choice of words, less is more etc.) to cater to the changing landscape but basics of story telling are still the same...

                        FWIW, This is my last post with regards to BL2020. Now, back to making revisions....

                        GL & Enjoy rest of the weekend!

                        --fallen

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