Weekend Post

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  • Weekend Post

    For a writer it never gets easier.

    Waiting.

    You've turned in your script to the producer/network/studio/agent/manager/professor/best friend.

    And now you wait for the response.

    And wait.

    And wait.

    And wait.

    And wait.

    You'd think in time it gets easier. It never does.

    You generally calculate in some reasonable reading time period. They'll read it over the weekend. But you still think, if they were really interested they'd read it tonight. Why aren't they reading it tonight?

    The longer you receive no answer the more you think they hated your script. He just can't bring himself to tell me how much it SUCKED! You start doubting the script, yourself, your religion, everything. You begin going through the script, re-examining every line. Jokes that just last week you thought were bulletproof now seem really lame.

    Then you reach the point where you wonder, should you remind them? And if so, how? This depends on the relationship.

    I would say this, try to find out what the reader's behavior pattern is beforehand. It might save you a lot of time and anxiety. There are some producers who just don't give you feedback. On a show we once worked on, we turned in our first draft and heard nothing. Weeks went by. The producers put our script into mimeo for the beginning of production and still said nothing. I was walking to the parking lot that night with one of the producers, and neurotic insecure writer that I am, I asked him what he thought of our script? He looked at me like I was crazy. His answer was "Well, we kept most of it, didn't we?- From that day on I never expected feedback from any script we turned into him (which is good because we never received any). But we knew he was pleased so that was good enough.

    I've known writers who thought they were getting fired at the end of the year only to get promoted. They had no idea where they stood. For some producers, that's their style.

    On the other hand, there was Larry Gelbart. Here's one of the many reasons I loved that man: You'd turn in a draft to Larry at the end of the day. Two hours later he would call you at home to tell you how much he liked the script. He understood the butterflies all writers experience waiting and went out of his way to be sensitive to that. When David Isaacs and I were running our own shows years later we adopted that same practice. If a writer turned in a draft we made the time to read it and respond right away. It's how we liked being treated; it's how we felt we should treat others.

    All I could say is hang in there. And don't build a "Jack story-.

    What's a "Jack story-? Well, it's often attributed to comedian Danny Thomas and I'm paraphrasing but it goes something like this:

    A guy's driving down a country road late at night and gets a flat tire. He opens his trunk to discover he has a spare but not a jack. Up ahead he sees a light. There's a house about a half-mile up the road. He decides to hike there and see if he can borrow a jack. He figures the owner of the house will gladly let him use it for a few minutes. Why wouldn't he?

    But as the guy trudges on he wonders -- maybe the homeowner won't be so neighborly. After all, he is a stranger. Maybe he'll be suspicious. Maybe he's the kind who doesn't like anyone touching his tools. He lives way out here in the middle of nowhere - he's probably anti-social, probably a real *******. The more the guy considers these options the angrier he gets until finally he reaches the house, rings the bell, the owner answers, and the guy says, "Screw you! I don't need your ****ing jack!- turns on his heel and marches off.

    Your script is just as good if it's read the first night or second week. So relax and have faith in yourself. Now, if I could just learn to believe that myself.

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